News

State high court refuses to hear Steve Jobs' appeal on Woodside mansion

Apple Computer CEO seeks to demolish historic Jackling house

The California Supreme Court does not want to hear about Steve Jobs’ quest to tear down a historic Woodside mansion. On April 25, the state's high court turned down Mr. Jobs' petition to hear his case.

Mr. Jobs, the CEO of Apple Inc., has been waging a losing battle against a group of preservationists over the fate of the Jackling house, a massive Spanish Colonial revival-style mansion built in 1926.

He said he plans to tear it down and build a new family home on the Mountain Home Road site, but has been thwarted by an ad-hoc preservation group called Uphold Our Heritage that filed suit to block the demolition

Mr. Jobs was granted a demolition permit by the town of Woodside in December 2004.

Uphold Our Heritage, led by Miami Beach resident Clotilde Luce, whose family owned the Jackling house in the 1960s, successfully halted the demolition, wining its case in both the trial court and appeals court.

Ms. Luce called yesterday’s state Supreme Court’s decision good news for preservationists.

Howard Ellman, Mr. Jobs' attorney, could not be immediately reached for comment.

The town of Woodside has no rules of its own regarding historic structures, so the fate of the Jackling house is governed by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

In order to justify granting Mr. Jobs a demolition permit, town officials needed to show proof that there were no feasible alternatives to tearing the house down. According to a trial court judge, and the state Court of Appeal, Woodside officials failed to show such proof.

Mr. Jobs has said that he plans to build a much smaller family home on the site, and referred to the Jackling house, where he lived for 10 years, as an architectural "abomination." In recent years, the Jackling house has been uninhabited and allowed to fall into disrepair.

The demolition permit for the Jackling house came with an unusual condition -- that Mr. Jobs offer to give away the mansion to someone who would relocate it and restore it. A handful of prospective takers have come forward, but the relocation plans have been on hold while the case made its way through the courts.

Information about the Jackling house is on the Uphold Our Heritage Web site here: http://www.friendsofthejacklinghouse.org/

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Choose a category: *

Since this is the first comment on this story a new topic will also be started in Town Square! Please choose a category that best describes this story.

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

Vina Enoteca to serve first 'Impossible burger' in Silicon Valley
By Elena Kadvany | 14 comments | 2,931 views

Coupon for Yourself and Your Partner
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 478 views

 

2017 guide to summer camps

Looking for something for the kids to do this summer, learn something new and have fun? The 2017 Summer Camp Guide features local camps for all ages and interests.

Find Camps Here