School communities take up climate change on their own | November 14, 2007 | Almanac | Almanac Online |


Cover Story - November 14, 2007

School communities take up climate change on their own

by David Boyce

California's official campaigns against global warming may be taking a hands-off approach to K-12 public school greenhouse gas emissions, but without much fanfare, local school communities are building their own bandwagons.

This story contains 593 words.

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Posted by Kay O'Neill, a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Nov 28, 2007 at 2:18 pm

Menlo Atherton High School diverted 80% of its waste from their annual fashion show luncheon. We composted most of our waste back into fertile soil by serving lunch in corn-based compostalbe dishes, cups and utensils. We recycled most of the waste sending five huge bags into compost, four into recycling and only two bags into bags of garbage into landfill. It was first for M-A to divert 80% of our luncheon (for a sold out crowd of 350) away from landfill.

Posted by registered user, David Boyce, a resident of Almanac staff writer
on Nov 28, 2007 at 4:16 pm

Ms. O'Neill - When you say that five bags of stuff went into compost, I'd like to know whose compost pile you're talking about. Is it a private one or the school's or did a waste hauler pick it up?

With compostable utensils and plates, and with typical paper products like napkins OK for a compost pile, what was left that went into the landfill?