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New law protects mountain lions

Original post made on Sep 13, 2013

Animal-control authorities now have a mandate to explore options other than lethal when dealing with mountain lions that visit residential areas but behave in non-threatening ways.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Friday, September 13, 2013, 8:46 AM

Comments (26)

Posted by Kevin, a resident of Menlo Park: Belle Haven
on Sep 13, 2013 at 12:20 pm

If a mtn. lion gets hungry enough, it might go for a human. And if there are too many of them, it's guaranteed some are going around hungry.


Posted by I Twaut I Taw a Puddy Tat!, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Sep 13, 2013 at 12:28 pm

" it might go for a human" "it's guaranteed some are going around hungry"

There are so many deer up in the hills. Take a hike. You'll be amazed at the deer. Besides, a domestic animal is easier than a human.


Posted by RUKidding, a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Sep 13, 2013 at 12:50 pm

Before and after killing their prey, mountain lions may well behave in "non-threatening" ways, such as taking a nap. So make nice with them when they're in your residential neighborhood. Right. Our elected officials, in their infinite wisdom, wish to protect wild mountain lions instead of people. Maybe the bill's sponsors should be the ones to stand around and assess the animals' behavior....

Mountain lions are dangerous predators. Before one of them eats your 2-year-old, or mauls or kills you and your spouse, let's overturn this surreal piece of legislation. That's where the real danger lies.


Posted by I Twaut I Taw a Puddy Tat!, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Sep 13, 2013 at 12:59 pm

"Our elected officials, in their infinite wisdom, wish to protect wild mountain lions instead of people"

How many humans killed by big cats in the US in the last 10 years?

As a point of reference, there have probably been over TWENTY THOUSAND gun deaths since Newton/Sandy Hook Elementary.

"Our elected officials, in their infinite wisdom, wish to protect wild mountain lions instead of people"

Maybe you have a point. Our elected officials are not protecting people very well. But then, big ol puddy cats are not the problem.


Posted by Good Neighbor, a resident of Portola Valley: Brookside Park
on Sep 13, 2013 at 1:05 pm

If we could all just remember the cat isn't looking through your windows at night, secretly stalking you and your families (pets included). YOU left your pets outside, YOU leave your small children unattended - yes even in your backyard is asking for trouble - YOU walked up and scared it as much as it scared you. Let's just agree to let it hunt it's normal prey and if we are frightened by it, good, nature worked, now go inside (you don't even have to lock your door to this predator.....)


Posted by Uncle Ted, a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Sep 13, 2013 at 1:05 pm

Mountain Lions are predators. The poster above in Emerald Hills will learn the hard way and it won't be amusing.


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Sep 13, 2013 at 1:10 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

If you are interested in the facts here is a very good book on the subject:
The Beast in the Garden: The True Story of a Predator's Deadly Return to Suburban America Paperback
by David Baron

When residents of Boulder, Colorado, suddenly began to see mountain lions in their backyards, it became clear that the cats had returned after decades of bounty hunting had driven them far from human settlement. In a riveting environmental tale that has received huge national attention, journalist David Baron traces the history of the mountain lion and chronicles one town's tragic effort to coexist with its new neighbors. As thought-provoking as it is harrowing, The Beast in the Garden is a tale of nature corrupted, the clash between civilization and wildness, and the artificiality of the modern American landscape. It is, ultimately, a book about the future of our nation, where suburban sprawl and wildlife-protection laws are pushing people and wild animals into uncomfortable, sometimes deadly proximity.


Posted by I Twaut I Taw a Puddy Tat!, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Sep 13, 2013 at 1:16 pm

uncle ted, (an homage to the Nuge? now that's funny!) been here 20 years, but thanks for your concern.

How many humans have been killed by big cats since I've been here?

More or less than died from drunk driving on 280? More or less than railroad tracks in the county? More or less than by guns in Woodside?


Posted by Uncle Ted, a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Sep 13, 2013 at 1:25 pm

Risk management involves loss prevention. The question is how many people have been saved due to DFG doing the right thing?

But to complete the unrelated comparisions, why not include how many children have died by fires in SM county that were living in unpermitted structures due to malfeasance of the building dept and code enforcement allowing overcrowding to not be a priority?


Posted by I Twaut I Taw a Puddy Tat!, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Sep 13, 2013 at 1:42 pm

Okay, so you haven't searched and found the death yet.

I'll bite, how many kids? Can you provide a number and a link, rather than some anecdotal 'evidence'?

Still working on your ridiculous opening statement, as it sounds like it came from deranged Nuge-land: "The poster above in Emerald Hills will learn the hard way and it won't be amusing." Been here 20 years, as I said, and you ignored....


Posted by howdy do, a resident of another community
on Sep 13, 2013 at 3:55 pm

This is the best news I've read about in a while!
Finally, some protection for the innocents.
I see that the reactionaries are putting in their two cents.
If you are that frightened that a mountain lion is going to come for you, please consider moving to a more densly populated area. Obviously, the hills are not for you.


Posted by Old-timer, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Sep 13, 2013 at 6:23 pm

Oh puleeze - get a condo in Foster City or near the Facebook campus; don't move into their territory and expect them to respect your entitlement to live here


Posted by Carol, a resident of Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Sep 15, 2013 at 5:47 pm

Save a lion; lose a pet or a child - how about a school yard full of children? Sounds like the twisted California Legislature at work.


Posted by Joe, a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Sep 15, 2013 at 5:56 pm

For a picture of nature out of balance, take a trip to Western Pennsylvania, where the deer have no natural predators.

My relatives live in a rural community. At night, the deer make free with their yard, dropping their calling cards in great profusion. Deer ticks, and Lyme disease, are EVERYWHERE. It's insane. The deer own the night. You don't want to walk in the lawn at night, and you have to watch where you step during the day.

It's a full time job cleaning up after them. And it wasn't always this way. The price of living with mountain lions is a small one when compared to what's going on in Pennsylvania.


Posted by Uncle Matt, a resident of Woodside: Kings Mountain/Skyline
on Sep 16, 2013 at 10:02 am

"Save a lion; lose a pet or a child"

Carol: please show me the links to all the children who have been lost to mountain lions.

Maybe y'all have it worse in "Menlo Oaks neighborhood" than I thought.......

The FEAR show is back in town...


Posted by Uncle Ted, a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Sep 16, 2013 at 1:25 pm

The worst loss is one preventable. One child will be too many. Tell me, how many would acceptable. Get the priorities in order.


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Sep 16, 2013 at 1:32 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

As the Boulder Co experience shows the issue is not saving a child vs saving a mountain lion but being smart enough to save both.

"The Beast in the Garden: The True Story of a Predator's Deadly Return to Suburban America Paperback

by David Baron

When residents of Boulder, Colorado, suddenly began to see mountain lions in their backyards, it became clear that the cats had returned after decades of bounty hunting had driven them far from human settlement. In a riveting environmental tale that has received huge national attention, journalist David Baron traces the history of the mountain lion and chronicles one town's tragic effort to coexist with its new neighbors. As thought-provoking as it is harrowing, The Beast in the Garden is a tale of nature corrupted, the clash between civilization and wildness, and the artificiality of the modern American landscape. It is, ultimately, a book about the future of our nation, where suburban sprawl and wildlife-protection laws are pushing people and wild animals into uncomfortable, sometimes deadly proximity."

There are some very simple lessons like do not leave cat and dog food outside, restore the mountain lion's fear of humans by using non-fatal means to scare them away, etc.. If you want the facts then read Barron's book.


Posted by Uncle Matt, a resident of Woodside: Kings Mountain/Skyline
on Sep 16, 2013 at 2:00 pm

"The worst loss is one preventable. One child will be too many. Tell me, how many would acceptable. Get the priorities in order."

Teddy: you were asked above by Puddy Tat to document your fearmongering, you have yet to do so. Number of children killed by lions? Or your pet subject: number of children by fire due to overcrowding in permitted buildings - your odd fixation of mountain lions somehow relating to zoning laws?

Guns kill more kids in a week than mountain lions do in a year, or a decade, maybe a century. More guns equal more deaths - "We observed a robust correlation between higher levels of gun ownership and higher firearm homicide rates" Web Link

"Get the priorities in order."

You are correct Ted, let's get our priorities straight and lower the number of guns. We all know if there is a gun in a home, it is 22 times more likely to be used to kill or injure a member of the gun-owner's family (domestic homicide, suicide, or unintentional shooting) than to be used in self-defense (source: www.bradycampaign.org)

"Get the priorities in order." Mountain lions are clearly not a priority up here. Are they that bad in your Fair Oaks neighborhood? I bet guns are a much worse problem down there.

"Get the priorities in order." Just ask Ted Nugent.


Posted by Ethan, a resident of Menlo Park: University Heights
on Sep 16, 2013 at 2:14 pm

A little perspective: Pit bulls are a lot more dangerous than lions. Between 2005 and 2012, that one breed killed 151 people in the U.S. There have been fewer than two dozen fatalities from mountain lion attacks in all of North American since 1890, and just three deaths since 2000 (two in the U.S.).


Posted by Uncle Matt, a resident of Woodside: Kings Mountain/Skyline
on Sep 16, 2013 at 2:23 pm

awwww, Ethan, you ruined the fearmongering by using documented facts! Party-pooper!

Two mountain lion deaths in the US in 13 years. More kids are killed by guns every week, maybe every day.

How can uncle ted, Carol, RUKidding and Kevin spread fear if you're going to deal in the fact based world? You know how much Fox viewers are allergic to facts and stuff. It ruins their whole day.


Posted by Uncle Ted, a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Sep 16, 2013 at 5:58 pm

UM above has quoted something he appears to have quite a lot of experience with...Fox News. Guns are similar to abortions...if you don't want one, don't have one. But respect other's rights for their FREEDOM OF CHOICE! Some choose to be armed and ready. If you are being robbed, I will respect your right to use self defense you've learned to protected yourself...same with an attacking hungry mountain lion. If Karate is all you have..so be it..the DFG won't save you.


Posted by Hmmm, a resident of another community
on Sep 16, 2013 at 7:16 pm

Just think - more mountain lions = fewer wild pigs for Uncle Ted to have to kill! Thanks, mountain lions!


Posted by Aunt Sally, a resident of Menlo Park: Felton Gables
on Sep 16, 2013 at 9:32 pm

UT is scared of mountain lions in Fair Oaks, so much so that he is forcing his family to live with the FAR GREATER risk of injury or death from guns than of the guns saving them from anything - "if there is a gun in a home, it is 22 times more likely to be used to kill or injure a member of the gun-owner's family (domestic homicide, suicide, or unintentional shooting) than to be used in self-defense"

How can a male ego be so strong, and so senseless as to subject his family to such risk? 22x the risk? Just senseless risk to pacify a male mindset.

UT - there are no mountain lions in Fair Oaks. Only the risk of your guns being stolen, or worse, being used on your family.


Posted by Nathan, a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Sep 17, 2013 at 12:49 pm

First time in years a good law passed. A lotta people were pissed when the tools just shot up the two cubs. Just ONE dumb idiot can create a law.


Posted by Uncle Ted, a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Sep 18, 2013 at 12:58 pm

Speaking of egos, citing one lives on an affluent area doesn't make it so, without any knowledge of one's education. Cars are more dangerous which injur and kill more people in the U.S. on a daily basis than guns ever have. Ask your insurance agent.


Posted by Coincidence?, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Sep 18, 2013 at 10:16 pm

Thank you Ethan and Uncle Matt for factual posts.

I do find it ironic that there are as many lost cat and lost dog posts in Nextdoor Woodside as there are Mountain Lion sightings. Coincidence?

If you live in mountain lion territory, keep your pets safe! Kids I'm less worried about, given the history and helicopter parents. Pets, however, are natural prey.


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