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Endangered butterflies released at Edgewood

Original post made on Mar 31, 2011

Biologists carrying coolers full of butterflies hiked into Edgewood County Park and Natural Preserve on Wednesday afternoon in an effort to reintroduce the endangered checkerspot butterfly into San Mateo County.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Thursday, March 31, 2011, 12:11 AM

Comments (5)

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Posted by karenstar02@gmail.com
a resident of another community
on Mar 31, 2011 at 12:44 pm

Wonderful news about the endangered butterflies. This year I have put out Audubon butterfly boxes in the yard.


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Posted by Jack Hickey
a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Mar 31, 2011 at 9:37 pm

I applaud the efforts of volunteers in their quest to resurrect the Checkerspot Butterfly on the lands of what could have been Checkerspot Meadows Golf Course.
As a resident of Emerald Lake for the past 46 years, I have followed the construction of I-280, which was rerouted to placate environmental advocates and Woodside "horsey" people (a Robert Trent Jones characterisation). See: Web Link
I have the San Francisco Water Department "Grant of Scenic and Recreation Easement" made in exchange for the I-280 rerouting which added 1/2 mile to the commute.
I remember Interior Secretary, Cecil Andrus, granting $500,000 to San Mateo County to build a golf course at what is now Edgewood park.
I listened as Francis Britschgi, speaking in favor of a golf course at Edgewood Park, told the Board of Supervisors how he ran cattle all over those ridges.
I've heard some say that if we had only let the cows graze on the invasive grasses, we wouldn't have lost the butterfly colony.
I am aware of two other colonies of the species which no longer exist. One, under the care of Paul Ehrlich, went extinct. Another was destroyed when Canada College was built.
I remember Lennie Roberts' Committee for Green Foothills with their "bait and switch" ploy suggesting the Southern Watershed, as an alternative to Edgewood Park, for a golf course. (which never happened)
From what I know about Golf Course Architects, I cannot help but feel that the Checkerspot Butterflies would have had a much better chance of survival if those architects were given that opportunity as a condition to development of a golf course.


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Posted by golf course?!?
a resident of Menlo-Atherton High School
on Apr 1, 2011 at 1:27 pm

Mr Hickey:

"I cannot help but feel that the Checkerspot Butterflies would have had a much better chance of survival if those architects were given that opportunity as a condition to development of a golf course"

Based on what? Their preference for Kentucky Bluegrass? Based on anotion that operators would cut into their profits to keep other invasive species out?

Glad you "feel" that way. Let us know when you will back in up with something other than guesses, assertions, baseless claims, etc...
"
"I remember..."

"some say..."

"I cannot help but feel ..."

"if"

"better chance"

Back in the 60's, developers wanted to lop off the top third of San bruno Mountain and dump it into the bay. Based on those memories and other clashes over development, I, for one, will always defer to the reasoning behind wait and see before giving into development.

A half mile longer commute? What's that, 30 seconds?


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Posted by Jack Hickey
a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Apr 3, 2011 at 8:58 am

I said "From what I know about Golf Course Architects, I cannot help but feel that the Checkerspot Butterflies would have had a much better chance of survival if those architects were given that opportunity as a condition to development of a golf course."
Mitigation is normally the way in which problems in an EIR are handled. This was not allowed to happen with Edgewood Park.
With the financial crises facing San Mateo County agencies, it's time to revisit the issue of environmentally friendly, revenue producing golf courses on public lands. The need for such facilities has increased since the 1987 study by ERA Associates, commissioned by San Mateo County Parks and Recreation Department, identified such fiscal viability of such golf course development.


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Posted by Jack Hickey
a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Apr 15, 2011 at 12:16 pm

For those interested in having revenue producing golf courses on public lands, I have uploaded "A Market and Financial Feasibility Analysis for a New Golf Course in San Mateo County" by ERA Associates, commissioned by the San Mateo County Parks and Recreation Department in 1987.
See: Web Link
Forget about an 1/8% sales tax. Proper stewardship of 1% of park and openspace lands could help support the remaining 99% of the land!


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