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Mountain lion spotted lying on front lawn

Original post made on Apr 28, 2011

A mountain lion was spotted lying on the front lawn of a home in Woodside on Tuesday night, according to the San Mateo County Sheriff's Office.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Thursday, April 28, 2011, 8:48 AM

Comments (19)

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Posted by Fred
a resident of Atherton: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 12:20 pm

It is a predator. Not controlling their numbers is foolish. Why wasn't it tranq'd and spayed or neutered at the very least?


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Posted by Sally
a resident of Woodside: Woodside Hills
on Apr 28, 2011 at 12:37 pm

Mt. Lions are not predators of people. We are in their territory. They were here first. They have every right to live naturally, just as much as you and I. Maybe you should be tranquilized and neutered. I'm just kidding, but you really need to respect wildlife more. We need to learn to co-exist, especially as we encroach more and more on their territory. What would you like to do, kill them all? Then you would complain about too many deer in your yard.


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Posted by Fred
a resident of Atherton: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 1:12 pm

Lady, it is only a matter of time. Web Link
Convince each one of the families of an injury or fatal attack your theory. Look at Peter Carpenters post on a previous related story. It is romantic to believe you, but Fantasy Land is in Anaheim. Don't worry, old age has taken its toll.


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Posted by bob
a resident of Woodside: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 1:12 pm

It was probably resting after a meal of deer. Fred are you going to tranq and nueter all of them, that could be tough. Ther hasn't been an attack on humans in this area in almost 100 years.


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Posted by Fred
a resident of Atherton: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 1:28 pm

There hadn't been gas pipeline explosions in San Bruno either. The ostrich approach will prove folly. There have been so many sitings that the lion to human interaction is coming. If DFG had an easy target, the should have taken it. It is the cats that do not fear humans which are the dangerous ones. Hey, live and learn as history repeats...and for some the it is unforgiving.


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Posted by Misunderstood
a resident of Atherton: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 1:33 pm

Fred
I don't think you understand people are afraid the deer is going to eat them, their children or a pet not have sex with them! LOL


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Posted by jackrabbit
a resident of Portola Valley: Westridge
on Apr 28, 2011 at 1:35 pm

Greaaaat. Live and let live. Finally some sense by government officials. If the animals are threatening to you and you are afraid, MOVE. They DO keep the deer population in check and, in turn, your roses might make it through another season.


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Posted by peter carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 28, 2011 at 1:37 pm

peter carpenter is a registered user.

Fred states:"It is the cats that do not fear humans which are the dangerous ones."

Absolutely correct. And as is documented in Beast in the Garden the only way to make mountain lions fear humans is to aggressively drive them away from human territory EVERY time that they encounter humans. Since they are solitary animals killing them has no learning value for the remaining animals. If we want to preserve the mountain lions then them must relearn their fear of humans; if they don't relearn their fear of humans then the only safe method of dealing with them when they threaten humans is, sadly, to kill them.

Playing pussy cats with mountain lions is a lose-lose strategy.


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Posted by bob
a resident of Woodside: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:11 pm

Peter when was the last attack by a mountian lion on a human in SM county? By the way when we will we here the results of the infamous FBI investigation of Stevce Wagstaff.


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Posted by peter carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:16 pm

peter carpenter is a registered user.

Bob asks:"Peter when was the last attack by a mountian lion on a human in SM county?"

None that I know of. Do you want to wait, like Boulder Colorado did, until a human is killed by a mountain lion before we do something to reduce the threat?

Bob asks:'By the way when we will we here the results of the infamous FBI investigation of Stevce Wagstaff."

The FBI investigation in San Mateo County covers a lot more than the DA's Office. And such a far reaching investigation takes time to do properly. When will it been done? Watch the evening news.


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Posted by bob
a resident of Woodside: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:28 pm

What does Boulder have to do with Woodside. What were the details of the Boulder attack and when do I have to watch the news. Will it be like the ncaa and Reggie Bush 5 years down the road?


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Posted by peter carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:42 pm

peter carpenter is a registered user.

Bob asks:"What does Boulder have to do with Woodside. What were the details of the Boulder attack"

Read Beast in the Garden by Holder.
"The theme of the artificiality of the wilderness around Boulder runs throughout The Beast in the Garden, as does the idea that by romanticizing this artificial wilderness and its supposed 'naturalness,' Boulder's citizens were shirking their responsibility to manage it properly and were refusing to understand their role in creating the conditions that had led to the return of cougars."

"Weaving together deep research, meticulous reporting, vivid characterization, disciplined prose, informative political and historical asides, lucid science, incisive wit, and narrative pacing as smooth and suspenseful as a stalking mountain lion, Baron has created a wily page-turner...."

The root of the problem is, as Baron documents so well in his book Beast in the Backyard, that mountain lions no longer fear humans. Since they are protected in California there is no reason for them not to push into human territories and that is exactly what they are doing.

The experience in Boulder Colorado where the residents encouraged mountain lions to 'share' their space with humans resulted in the mountain lions losing their fear of humans. The mountain lions became comfortable around humans and started eating their dog food and then their dogs. Finally a mountain lion attacked and killed an adult human.

The solution was a vigorous program of reinstilling fear of humans into the mountain lion population. This involved attacking them with painful but non lethal substances whenever the mountain lions encountered humans. The mountain lions learned to avoid humans and human spaces. Killing a mountain lion produces no such learning as they are solitary animals and hence there are no other mountain lions to witness and learn from such a killing.

Baron's Beast in the Garden describes how the Boulder community learned to deal with this problem without having to kill the mountain lions. But it took a human death to convince the humans that they had to stop playing pussy cat with wild animals.

But I suspect, as usual, we will continue to think that we are special and where we live is unique and that there is nothing to be learned from other communities who have dealt with this problem.


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Posted by POGO
a resident of Woodside: other
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:43 pm

I was in Orange County the week this mountain lion attack occurred. It wasn't that long ago...

Web Link


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Posted by peter carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:44 pm

peter carpenter is a registered user.

Beast in the Garden;The True Story of a Predator's Deadly Return to Suburban America by Baron

Web Link



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Posted by peter carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 28, 2011 at 2:55 pm

peter carpenter is a registered user.


Web Link

"This page links to a list of mountain lion attacks on people in California (but only through 2003), and another complete list of all such attacks in the U.S.(but only through 2003). If you know of an attack not listed here, please email me for attacks in California, or my coauthor Linda Lewis for attacks outside of California.

I define an attack as one that involves physical contact by mountain lions on people. This does not include an encounter, where a mountain lion may threaten a person, but does not result in physical contact. Nor does it include a sighting, which usually involves no threatening action by the cougar.

Mountain lions are known by many names: cougar, panther, and puma. The "lion" term is due only to their color; in fact cougars are more closely related to leopards than to lions. In the text below, lion will always refer to cougar.

Mountain lion attacks on people apparently increased dramatically since 1986. For example, in California, there were two fatal attacks in 1890 and 1909, and then no further attacks for 77 years, until 1986. From 1986 through 1995, nine verified attacks occurred, an average rate of almost one per year. Attacks were numerous enough to form a support group for attack victims, called California Lion Awareness (CLAW; Outside, 10/95).

Mountain lion sightings have increased dramatically as well, from 59 in 1991 to over 300 in 1994 in California. However, because of a number of reasons, perhaps 80% of all lion sightings are actually deer, bobcats, dogs, and even domestic cats. Part of any increase in sightings is also surely due to the heightened awareness of lions with the increase in attacks. Of course, this means 20% of all mountain lion sightings are of actual mountain lions!


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Posted by get a grip
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Apr 28, 2011 at 3:27 pm

The following was cribbed from an Amazon.com review of the above book (don't even get me started about how many people are killed and injured by automobiles in the U.S. every year...):

Encounters with cougars are rare and the risk of injury or death from an attack is infinitely small. In fact, your chances of being attacked or killed by a domestic dog are much, much greater. DFG statistics show that, in the last 20 years, hunting accidents killed more than 85 Californians and injured 700. In the last 100 years, only 14 fatal cougar attacks occurred on the entire North American continent. In that time, more than 15,000 people were killed by lightning; 4,000 by bees; 10,000 by deer; 1,300 by rattlesnakes. Yosemite National Park has cougars plus 3 million visitors a year. There has never been an attack in the park's history. More visitors have died from rockslides. On the list of daily "dangers" faced by Californians, cougars are but a footnote.


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Posted by peter carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 28, 2011 at 3:34 pm

peter carpenter is a registered user.

Get a grip cites accurate statistics but the issue being heatedly debated is how to deal with mountain lions that move into places of human habitation (granted they we actually moved into their space first). There is a low probability that they will kill someone but does that justify killing them on sight?

Some say kill them, others say don't kill them.

In fact the answer is neither of the above but rather to reinstill fear of humans in the mountain lion population.


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Posted by Mars
a resident of Menlo Park: Felton Gables
on Apr 29, 2011 at 3:46 pm

Lets not wait until the slugs grow too large for us to kill.

Kill all slugs now! Think of the children!


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Posted by df and g
a resident of another community
on May 3, 2011 at 5:18 pm

open up a season for black tail deer down there. buck and doe. that will decrease your mountain lion sightings.


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