Arts

Whisper comes to the Art Kiosk

Installation by Shiyao Lin explores social distance and connection

Whisper by Shiyao Lin is installed through Aug. 9 at the Art Kiosk in Redwood City. Courtesy Fung Collaboratives.

Shiyao Lin's Whisper, the latest installation in downtown Redwood City's Art Kiosk space, considers the perils of isolation and the importance of staying connected.

On view through Aug. 9, the piece depicts two human forms — male and female — set 6 feet apart and connected by tin cans and a string, representing social-distancing and the old-fashioned telephone game enjoyed by children for years. The string is illuminated and twinkles by night.

"The two figures are both left intentionally unpolished, each one of them missing one arm, and the audience can look at the hollowness inside of them. This symbolizes flaws within each of us and represents we are incomplete as individuals when being isolated and separate from human connection," according to a press release by Fung Collaboratives, which curates the Art Kiosk exhibitions. "Humans should never stop searching for connections. Shiyao believes, it is something rooted in human nature and should not be denied."

The artist recently received her bachelor's of fine arts degree; this is her first solo exhibition. The Art Kiosk is located on Courthouse Square and is viewable at any time.

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Whisper comes to the Art Kiosk

Installation by Shiyao Lin explores social distance and connection

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Jul 15, 2020, 11:29 am

Shiyao Lin's Whisper, the latest installation in downtown Redwood City's Art Kiosk space, considers the perils of isolation and the importance of staying connected.

On view through Aug. 9, the piece depicts two human forms — male and female — set 6 feet apart and connected by tin cans and a string, representing social-distancing and the old-fashioned telephone game enjoyed by children for years. The string is illuminated and twinkles by night.

"The two figures are both left intentionally unpolished, each one of them missing one arm, and the audience can look at the hollowness inside of them. This symbolizes flaws within each of us and represents we are incomplete as individuals when being isolated and separate from human connection," according to a press release by Fung Collaboratives, which curates the Art Kiosk exhibitions. "Humans should never stop searching for connections. Shiyao believes, it is something rooted in human nature and should not be denied."

The artist recently received her bachelor's of fine arts degree; this is her first solo exhibition. The Art Kiosk is located on Courthouse Square and is viewable at any time.

Comments

MACA
Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Jul 15, 2020 at 11:21 pm
MACA, Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Jul 15, 2020 at 11:21 pm

Very thoughtful Artwork. I love the positive reinforcement of the human need to communicate.❤️


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