Arts

Events mark anniversaries of Hiroshima, Nagasaki bombings with hopes for peace

The public is invited to help fold 1,000 paper cranes to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The cranes will be displayed on a trellis outside Menlo Park's Art Ventures Gallery. Courtesy Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

The first week in August will mark the 75th anniversaries of the United States dropping nuclear bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Several local organizations are offering ways to remember and reflect on these somber milestones, with events that highlight hopes for peace.

Members of the community are invited to take part in an effort to fold 1,000 origami paper cranes for display outside the Art Ventures Gallery in Menlo Park. The gallery has joined with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the nonprofit Menlo Park Public Art to present the installation. Now through Aug. 6, members of the public are invited to take home a packet from the trellis outside Art Ventures Gallery. The packet includes instructions for making paper cranes, as well as tiny cranes sent as gifts from peace activists in Ehime, Japan. Once participants have made their cranes at home, they're asked to bring them back and attach them to a display on the gallery's trellis.

Pick up a packet to make cranes before Aug. 6 at Art Ventures Gallery, 888 Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park. For more information, email [email protected]

On Thursday, Aug. 6, the Menlo Park Library presents the story that has tied paper cranes so closely to the peace movement. In an online event, bilingual storyteller Megumi shares the story of Sadako Sasaki, a Japanese girl from Hiroshima who died at age 12 from leukemia caused by the bombing. In the months before her death, Sadako made more than 1,000 cranes, inspired by a legend that folding 1,000 paper cranes would grant a wish. After Megumi finishes Sadako's story and leads a discussion about it, she will share a how-to on folding paper cranes.

The program is recommended for adults and mature children over 10. The event takes place Aug. 6, 4-5:30 p.m. online. Visit menlopark.org

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Events mark anniversaries of Hiroshima, Nagasaki bombings with hopes for peace

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Jul 29, 2020, 4:02 pm

The first week in August will mark the 75th anniversaries of the United States dropping nuclear bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Several local organizations are offering ways to remember and reflect on these somber milestones, with events that highlight hopes for peace.

Members of the community are invited to take part in an effort to fold 1,000 origami paper cranes for display outside the Art Ventures Gallery in Menlo Park. The gallery has joined with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the nonprofit Menlo Park Public Art to present the installation. Now through Aug. 6, members of the public are invited to take home a packet from the trellis outside Art Ventures Gallery. The packet includes instructions for making paper cranes, as well as tiny cranes sent as gifts from peace activists in Ehime, Japan. Once participants have made their cranes at home, they're asked to bring them back and attach them to a display on the gallery's trellis.

Pick up a packet to make cranes before Aug. 6 at Art Ventures Gallery, 888 Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park. For more information, email [email protected]

On Thursday, Aug. 6, the Menlo Park Library presents the story that has tied paper cranes so closely to the peace movement. In an online event, bilingual storyteller Megumi shares the story of Sadako Sasaki, a Japanese girl from Hiroshima who died at age 12 from leukemia caused by the bombing. In the months before her death, Sadako made more than 1,000 cranes, inspired by a legend that folding 1,000 paper cranes would grant a wish. After Megumi finishes Sadako's story and leads a discussion about it, she will share a how-to on folding paper cranes.

The program is recommended for adults and mature children over 10. The event takes place Aug. 6, 4-5:30 p.m. online. Visit menlopark.org

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