Arts

Palo Alto's King Plaza hosts temporary labyrinth

Public-art installation is made from repurposed artificial turf

"The Bucolic Labyrinth" being installed in Palo Alto's King Plaza, as seen from above, on Aug. 10. Courtesy Palo Alto Public Art Program.

The latest piece of temporary public art to come to downtown Palo Alto's King Plaza is artist Paz de la Calzada's "The Bucolic Labryinth," installed this week in front of City Hall.

The piece "is a site-specific interactive installation that offers a playful urban meditation environment while highlighting the powerful capacity of art to transform discarded material into a work of artistic expression," according to a statement from the Palo Alto Public Art Program.

The artist used repurposed synthetic turf from Cubberley Community Center's soccer field to create the labyrinth, which will be on view until November.

Labyrinths have traditionally been used as tools for meditation and self-reflection.

"Have you ever thought that the formal procedures that are performed before, during and after sporting events resemble those performed for religious purposes? I do. And this project highlights the connection between sports, sacred space and ritual," de la Calzada wrote in a social media statement.

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Palo Alto's King Plaza hosts temporary labyrinth

Public-art installation is made from repurposed artificial turf

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Aug 14, 2020, 11:01 am

The latest piece of temporary public art to come to downtown Palo Alto's King Plaza is artist Paz de la Calzada's "The Bucolic Labryinth," installed this week in front of City Hall.

The piece "is a site-specific interactive installation that offers a playful urban meditation environment while highlighting the powerful capacity of art to transform discarded material into a work of artistic expression," according to a statement from the Palo Alto Public Art Program.

The artist used repurposed synthetic turf from Cubberley Community Center's soccer field to create the labyrinth, which will be on view until November.

Labyrinths have traditionally been used as tools for meditation and self-reflection.

"Have you ever thought that the formal procedures that are performed before, during and after sporting events resemble those performed for religious purposes? I do. And this project highlights the connection between sports, sacred space and ritual," de la Calzada wrote in a social media statement.

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