Arts

So the story goes: Festival highlights storytelling

Library's Storytelling Festival showcases a month of sharing tales, but with no books to be found

The Storytelling Festival at the Menlo Park Library celebrates the power of words beyond the printed page, showcasing the enduring art of oral storytelling: that is, sharing a story without using a book.

Krupa Vinayagamoorthy, a storyteller from Singapore, will share tales as part of Storyfest, the Oct. 1 kickoff event for the Menlo Park Library's Storytelling Festival. Courtesy Menlo Park Library

The fifth annual edition of the festival just kicked off and is taking place entirely online, with events throughout the month of October.

The Storytelling Festival kicks off Oct. 1 with "StoryFest," an event geared for listeners ages 5 to adult, featuring a dozen storytellers, including local tellers and special guests from Hawaii (Jeff Gere), Australia (Lillian Rodrigues-Pang) and Singapore (Krupa Vinayagamoorthy).

Though storytelling is often associated with young children, the festival offers programs for various ages.

The festival runs through Oct. 29, with most events taking place on Thursdays, 6:30-7:30 p.m., unless otherwise noted.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Almanac Online for as little as $5/month.

Learn more

Michael D. McCarty, who specializes in stories of African and African-American history and culture, and multicultural stories, will share folk, personal and historical tales on Oct. 8 in an event for adults and teens. "The Spirit Survives" on Monday, Oct. 12, 4-5:30 p.m., features Dovie Thomason telling listeners ages 12 to adult about a shameful chapter in U.S. history, when First Nations children were forced to attend government boarding schools that stripped them of their culture and identities.

Lillian Rodrigues-Pang, a storyteller from Australia, will be featured in Storyfest, the Oct. 1 kickoff event for the Menlo Park Library's Storytelling Festival. Courtesy Menlo Park Library

On Oct. 15, Chetter Galloway presents "A Tale of a Few Tricksters!", a collection of folktales from the African diaspora for adults and teens; and on Oct. 22, Linda Yemoto will share nature tales, Asian folktales and ghost stories for all ages.

The Storytelling Festival concludes on Oct. 29, with Día de Muertos/Day of the Dead tales for ages 11 to adult from Olga Loya, who often tells stories in both English and Spanish.

The Storytelling Festival is free. For more information, visit menlopark.org/adults.

Jeff Gere, a storyteller from Hawaii, will be take part in Storyfest, an Oct. 1 event for ages 5 to adult that kicks off the monthlong the Menlo Park Library's Storytelling Festival. Courtesy Menlo Park Library

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews, Facebook and on Instagram @almanacnews for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

So the story goes: Festival highlights storytelling

Library's Storytelling Festival showcases a month of sharing tales, but with no books to be found

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Sep 30, 2020, 4:03 pm

The Storytelling Festival at the Menlo Park Library celebrates the power of words beyond the printed page, showcasing the enduring art of oral storytelling: that is, sharing a story without using a book.

The fifth annual edition of the festival just kicked off and is taking place entirely online, with events throughout the month of October.

The Storytelling Festival kicks off Oct. 1 with "StoryFest," an event geared for listeners ages 5 to adult, featuring a dozen storytellers, including local tellers and special guests from Hawaii (Jeff Gere), Australia (Lillian Rodrigues-Pang) and Singapore (Krupa Vinayagamoorthy).

Though storytelling is often associated with young children, the festival offers programs for various ages.

The festival runs through Oct. 29, with most events taking place on Thursdays, 6:30-7:30 p.m., unless otherwise noted.

Michael D. McCarty, who specializes in stories of African and African-American history and culture, and multicultural stories, will share folk, personal and historical tales on Oct. 8 in an event for adults and teens. "The Spirit Survives" on Monday, Oct. 12, 4-5:30 p.m., features Dovie Thomason telling listeners ages 12 to adult about a shameful chapter in U.S. history, when First Nations children were forced to attend government boarding schools that stripped them of their culture and identities.

On Oct. 15, Chetter Galloway presents "A Tale of a Few Tricksters!", a collection of folktales from the African diaspora for adults and teens; and on Oct. 22, Linda Yemoto will share nature tales, Asian folktales and ghost stories for all ages.

The Storytelling Festival concludes on Oct. 29, with Día de Muertos/Day of the Dead tales for ages 11 to adult from Olga Loya, who often tells stories in both English and Spanish.

The Storytelling Festival is free. For more information, visit menlopark.org/adults.

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.