Arts

Native plant society puts a ring on it with online wreath competition

Kathleen Kubota of Descanso Gardens created this wreath. Courtesy California Native Plant Society

Native plants can be a boon to both local fauna and to gardeners: they attract pollinators and other wildlife, they conserve water and the list goes on. But these useful plants aren't always revered for their ornamental properties, so the California Native Plant Society is hosting an online competition that shows native plants can not only be decorative, but festive too.

The society's WreathMasters competition, taking place Friday, Dec. 18 at 6 p.m., showcases more than 100 wreaths crafted by society members and other organizations from around the state, including from the Santa Clara Valley chapter, as well as local groups such as Grassroots Ecology and Our City Forest.

The holiday decor must use at least 51% native plants, which can't have been foraged from a wild environment but rather from a garden, according to the native plant society's website.

The wreath makers are competing in six creative categories, with everything from "Most 'I Want to Hang This on my Door'" and "Avant Garden" to "Best in Show" and a kids' category.

Even if you can't make the official judging event, all of the wreaths are currently viewable online and for those inspired to create their own wreaths, the society's website offers links to articles with ideas and instructions.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Almanac Online for as little as $5/month.

Learn more

For more information, or to register to attend, visit cnps.org/wreathmasters

A wreath made by Claire Grist of Grassroots Ecology. Courtesy California Native Plant Society

A wreath created by the staff at the Theodore Payne Foundation. Courtesy California Native Plant Society

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews, Facebook and on Instagram @almanacnews for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Native plant society puts a ring on it with online wreath competition

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, Dec 17, 2020, 10:47 am

Native plants can be a boon to both local fauna and to gardeners: they attract pollinators and other wildlife, they conserve water and the list goes on. But these useful plants aren't always revered for their ornamental properties, so the California Native Plant Society is hosting an online competition that shows native plants can not only be decorative, but festive too.

The society's WreathMasters competition, taking place Friday, Dec. 18 at 6 p.m., showcases more than 100 wreaths crafted by society members and other organizations from around the state, including from the Santa Clara Valley chapter, as well as local groups such as Grassroots Ecology and Our City Forest.

The holiday decor must use at least 51% native plants, which can't have been foraged from a wild environment but rather from a garden, according to the native plant society's website.

The wreath makers are competing in six creative categories, with everything from "Most 'I Want to Hang This on my Door'" and "Avant Garden" to "Best in Show" and a kids' category.

Even if you can't make the official judging event, all of the wreaths are currently viewable online and for those inspired to create their own wreaths, the society's website offers links to articles with ideas and instructions.

For more information, or to register to attend, visit cnps.org/wreathmasters

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.