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Holiday tips for dog owners

 

Submitted by Rick Saletta, webmaster for MenloDogOwners.org.

The holiday break affords us a little extra time with our canine companions. However, the holiday's also present a few risks to your pet's safety that families with pets must be made aware of.

If your dog stays in the car, crack the windows open and leave enough water for your short trip as the California sun heats a car rapidly, even in the winter.

If you are considering adding a dog to your family this holiday season, take a look at Pets In Need in Redwood City (link below), a local no-kill shelter that specializes in placing small to mid-sized dogs into homes.

Check MenloDogOwners.org for a list of local no-kill rescue organizations.

Many of the traditional Christmas plants -- including holly, mistletoe and poinsettias -- have fruit or leaves that are poisonous to dogs and must be kept well out of reach at all times. Chocolate, grapes, raisins, onions and garlic are some of the foods that can not be digested by dogs and can be dangerous even in small amounts.

Beware of leftovers that may contain onion powder or ground garlic. A list of harmful plants is available on our website.

Tape over electrical cords or conceal them behind furniture as best as possible. Also, cover the drip pan under your Christmas tree so that your pet does not drink water contaminated with plant food or fertilizer.

Perhaps most alarming, wool does not pass through a dog's system and can be lethal. With all of the people coming and going at irregular times, the holidays can be stressful on a pet that may otherwise never chew or shred anything. (And don't pretend that you've never been stressed at Christmas.)

Do not leave your dog alone with new wool sweaters, coats and blankets.

Antifreeze is deadly to animals. In fact, most automotive fluids, such as brake and radiator fluids, are highly toxic. When guests visit, do not lock your dog in a garage where toxins are stored, and check your driveway for engine leaks after they leave.

Finally, put a note on the door reminding guests not to let the dog slip out the door into the busy holiday traffic.

A little advance safety planning will assure you can spend a safe and pleasant holiday with your family and friends rather than a day at the vet. But if you do need help on Christmas, the South Peninsula 24 hour Emergency Veterinary Clinic located at 3045 Middlefield Road in Palo Alto will be open and can be reached at (650) 494-1461.

Go to MenloDogOwners.org for more information about this topic and about adoption, doggie day care, boarding, travel tips, and health and wellness.

Comments

Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of another community
on Dec 27, 2010 at 12:37 pm

And a shout-out to the shelters that unfortunately do have to euthanize animals: Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA, our San Mateo County Shelter, which does so much good for animals & people. They go way beyond what we think a county shelter will do for an adoptable animal: lots of walks, one on one interaction for the smaller pets, medical care which often includes surgery, foster homes, a wonderful volunteer program which benefits people and pets, a program w/dogs to help kids learn to read, rehab work with wildlife, and when they have farm animals, they work hard to place them in a sanctuary or with people who won't use the animal as meat.

A lot of no kill places get all the kudos, but take a look at your county shelter - the responsibility for the well-being of all the county's animals lies with them, because of how often humans don't take responsibility for how they effect animals.


Like this comment
Posted by Sybille
a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Dec 27, 2010 at 4:59 pm

I totally agree w/ Hmmmm. PHS is also a great place to find a new pet. Go PHS!!!


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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