News

Wimberly's exit from coaching not what she envisioned

By Keith Peters

Palo Alto Online Sports

It could have been an ending to any other school year for Pam Wimberly, who handed out some diplomas at Menlo-Atherton's graduation ceremony on Thursday and looked ahead to teaching summer school.

When Wimberly returns to school in the fall to resume her PE teaching duties, however, things will be very different.

For one, the 65-year-old Wimberly will not be standing on the basketball court for the first day of practice on November 1. After 42 years of coaching the girls' hoop team at M-A (she started in 1968-69 but missed two seasons), Wimberly will be a spectator for the first time.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Almanac Online for as little as $5/month.

Learn more

That decision was made on June 1 when M-A Principal Matthew Zito informed Wimberly that her coaching career at the school was over.

"I will go on and teach my classes, and enjoy more things in life," she said. "I'm coming to grips with what happened."

What happened was, after two losing seasons, co-Athletic Directors Paul Snow and Steven Kryger, along with Zito, decided that Wimberly evidently had seen better days. Forget the fact she had compiled a won-loss record of 663-340 in her 42 years while becoming the third-winningest girls' hoop coach in California. Forget the fact she had won four Central Coast Section titles (1984, 1991, 1992 and 1993) or been runner-up six times. And forget that she missed the CCS playoffs only 10 times in 36 years since the section postseason began in 1977.

In 2001, Wimberly was named Girls' Basketball Coach of the Year by the California Coaches Association and was selected as one of 13 coaches honored with the Model Coach Award by the California Interscholastic Federation.

While no one wanted to state the obvious, going 10-16 this past season and 7-18 in 2010-11 while missing the CCS playoffs both times reportedly did not enamor Wimberly with a group of M-A parents who evidently wanted more. It was a clash of style over substance and the supposed weight of parental pressure apparently won out.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

A statement released by Kryger said: "Pam accomplished many great feats over the course of her career and the M-A community is grateful for all that she did for hundreds of student-athletes. We feel this is the time to make the transition to a new head varsity coach for our girls' basketball program."

Somehow, that rings hollow. Coaches at public schools are removed from their position for verbal or physical abuse, lack of effort or causing more headaches than it's worth. Wimberly, however, was a role model with an exemplary career. It was never about the wins and losses for her.

"Six hundred wins wasn't a goal," she said. "I just started coaching the kids. It was never about the records. I know I fell short of 700 (wins), but that's not a big deal."

Wimberly had a tough day on Wednesday, as phone calls and e-mails flooded in.

"It was a tumultuous day," she said. "I got teary-eyed from what people said. There's been a lot of out-pouring of support."

One e-mail of support was sent to the entire staff at M-A by Dr. Jerry Brodkey, another veteran staff member and a fan of women's basketball from his days of growing up in Iowa, when they played 6-on-6.

Wrote Dr. Brodkey:

"Last night a friend sent me an email stating that Pam Wimberly had been relieved of her coaching duties at Menlo-Atherton. There was an article in today's Mercury confirming the news. It was hard to believe; Pam has been here long before even I arrived 30 years ago. Pam is not just another coach who works here a few years and then moves on. She has been a pillar of our community. I had some trouble sleeping pondering the news and thought I'd take a few minutes to express some thoughts. It is a busy time -- graduation, finals, all of us scattering for the summer. With all of this going on, I don't want this to go unnoticed.

"I am not sure why Pam was relieved of her coaching responsibilities, or how it was done. Perhaps these questions can be addressed in appropriate settings at a future time. Pam Wimberly is a record-setting, legendary basketball coach, but she has been so much more than that here at MA. I have watched her coach for so many years, sometimes with championship teams, sometimes with poor teams. At all times, she was a model of professionalism. I don't believe I ever saw her get a technical, never saw her lose her composure. She was a role model, not just for her players, but for other coaches, for parents, for fans. I would watch Pam during games, watching her as a teacher. Even in moments of great stress and tension she was positive, patient, and caring. I watched her and learned from her each time I saw her coach.

"At times, some of my students were on her teams. It didn't matter if they were students in my AP classes, or if they were students struggling in my most remedial math classes. She treated each student with respect. She would mold her players into a team, blending their individual skills and talents. I am not a basketball expert, but I was always impressed how these diverse individuals would come together under her tutelage. She taught her players how to win, how to lose, and how to be a family together. Pam was a critical mentor for so many young people through the years.

"Pam has been valued colleague. I have never envied the PE teachers with their giant classes and huge challenges. Year after year, she did her job. When my students would tell me they had Wimberly for PE, I knew they would be fine.

"Over the years I didn't get to see Pam as much as I would have liked. I was in the D-wing, she was in the gym. Each time I saw her or thought of her, I had the same thought: There goes a teacher's teacher, a coach's coach. Pam Wimberly, a true member of any Hall of Fame."

Craving a new voice in Peninsula dining?

Sign up for the Peninsula Foodist newsletter.

Sign up now

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews, Facebook and on Instagram @almanacnews for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Wimberly's exit from coaching not what she envisioned

Uploaded: Fri, Jun 8, 2012, 10:59 am
Updated: Fri, Jun 8, 2012, 6:10 pm

By Keith Peters

Palo Alto Online Sports

It could have been an ending to any other school year for Pam Wimberly, who handed out some diplomas at Menlo-Atherton's graduation ceremony on Thursday and looked ahead to teaching summer school.

When Wimberly returns to school in the fall to resume her PE teaching duties, however, things will be very different.

For one, the 65-year-old Wimberly will not be standing on the basketball court for the first day of practice on November 1. After 42 years of coaching the girls' hoop team at M-A (she started in 1968-69 but missed two seasons), Wimberly will be a spectator for the first time.

That decision was made on June 1 when M-A Principal Matthew Zito informed Wimberly that her coaching career at the school was over.

"I will go on and teach my classes, and enjoy more things in life," she said. "I'm coming to grips with what happened."

What happened was, after two losing seasons, co-Athletic Directors Paul Snow and Steven Kryger, along with Zito, decided that Wimberly evidently had seen better days. Forget the fact she had compiled a won-loss record of 663-340 in her 42 years while becoming the third-winningest girls' hoop coach in California. Forget the fact she had won four Central Coast Section titles (1984, 1991, 1992 and 1993) or been runner-up six times. And forget that she missed the CCS playoffs only 10 times in 36 years since the section postseason began in 1977.

In 2001, Wimberly was named Girls' Basketball Coach of the Year by the California Coaches Association and was selected as one of 13 coaches honored with the Model Coach Award by the California Interscholastic Federation.

While no one wanted to state the obvious, going 10-16 this past season and 7-18 in 2010-11 while missing the CCS playoffs both times reportedly did not enamor Wimberly with a group of M-A parents who evidently wanted more. It was a clash of style over substance and the supposed weight of parental pressure apparently won out.

A statement released by Kryger said: "Pam accomplished many great feats over the course of her career and the M-A community is grateful for all that she did for hundreds of student-athletes. We feel this is the time to make the transition to a new head varsity coach for our girls' basketball program."

Somehow, that rings hollow. Coaches at public schools are removed from their position for verbal or physical abuse, lack of effort or causing more headaches than it's worth. Wimberly, however, was a role model with an exemplary career. It was never about the wins and losses for her.

"Six hundred wins wasn't a goal," she said. "I just started coaching the kids. It was never about the records. I know I fell short of 700 (wins), but that's not a big deal."

Wimberly had a tough day on Wednesday, as phone calls and e-mails flooded in.

"It was a tumultuous day," she said. "I got teary-eyed from what people said. There's been a lot of out-pouring of support."

One e-mail of support was sent to the entire staff at M-A by Dr. Jerry Brodkey, another veteran staff member and a fan of women's basketball from his days of growing up in Iowa, when they played 6-on-6.

Wrote Dr. Brodkey:

"Last night a friend sent me an email stating that Pam Wimberly had been relieved of her coaching duties at Menlo-Atherton. There was an article in today's Mercury confirming the news. It was hard to believe; Pam has been here long before even I arrived 30 years ago. Pam is not just another coach who works here a few years and then moves on. She has been a pillar of our community. I had some trouble sleeping pondering the news and thought I'd take a few minutes to express some thoughts. It is a busy time -- graduation, finals, all of us scattering for the summer. With all of this going on, I don't want this to go unnoticed.

"I am not sure why Pam was relieved of her coaching responsibilities, or how it was done. Perhaps these questions can be addressed in appropriate settings at a future time. Pam Wimberly is a record-setting, legendary basketball coach, but she has been so much more than that here at MA. I have watched her coach for so many years, sometimes with championship teams, sometimes with poor teams. At all times, she was a model of professionalism. I don't believe I ever saw her get a technical, never saw her lose her composure. She was a role model, not just for her players, but for other coaches, for parents, for fans. I would watch Pam during games, watching her as a teacher. Even in moments of great stress and tension she was positive, patient, and caring. I watched her and learned from her each time I saw her coach.

"At times, some of my students were on her teams. It didn't matter if they were students in my AP classes, or if they were students struggling in my most remedial math classes. She treated each student with respect. She would mold her players into a team, blending their individual skills and talents. I am not a basketball expert, but I was always impressed how these diverse individuals would come together under her tutelage. She taught her players how to win, how to lose, and how to be a family together. Pam was a critical mentor for so many young people through the years.

"Pam has been valued colleague. I have never envied the PE teachers with their giant classes and huge challenges. Year after year, she did her job. When my students would tell me they had Wimberly for PE, I knew they would be fine.

"Over the years I didn't get to see Pam as much as I would have liked. I was in the D-wing, she was in the gym. Each time I saw her or thought of her, I had the same thought: There goes a teacher's teacher, a coach's coach. Pam Wimberly, a true member of any Hall of Fame."

Comments

Joe
Menlo Park: Suburban Park/Lorelei Manor/Flood Park Triangle
on Jun 8, 2012 at 2:00 pm
Joe, Menlo Park: Suburban Park/Lorelei Manor/Flood Park Triangle
on Jun 8, 2012 at 2:00 pm
Like this comment

From the information in this story it seems that MA could have found a more graceful way to conduct this transition. What a dissatisfying way to end a coaching career. Maybe it was time for a change, but she should have been allowed to retire not just told she wasn't coming back. I would hope for more professionalism from school officials but not surprised by their conduct.

My compliments to Ms. Wimberly for her dedication to MA over these many years.


KAM
another community
on Jun 8, 2012 at 3:23 pm
KAM, another community
on Jun 8, 2012 at 3:23 pm
2 people like this

Seriously MA? I am not even a parent in your community, but knew Pam just a little when our children were playing sports together and have followed her career. She is a consummate role model on how to live your life. The most upbeat and kind person you will find anywhere. Add to that her innate ability to coach and her insane way to connect personally--well, I am shocked and sad to learn of this decision. My daughter, at 35, most likely can't tell you now the win-lose record for her varsity sports teams in hs--while it seemed vitally important at the time. Some o her seasons definitely had losing records. But, she can tell you the coach (only a couple) who made the difference in her life as how to live your life. And yes, she did end up playing a Div. I sport, regardless those losing seasons. What high school doesn't have a couple years with some losing records. Dump a coach like Pam? Good luck replacing her folks. I can't believe how insensitively this has been handled. Again seriously? So sorry Pam, you deserved a balloon-filled auditorium exit.


Sue
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 8, 2012 at 9:34 pm
Sue, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 8, 2012 at 9:34 pm
2 people like this

Despite whatever reasons Ms. Wimberly was given by the powers to be, their timing was pretty rotten. She has been a legendary part of our local sports community for decades and did not deserve to be publicly humiliated just prior to M-A's graduation, in which she participated as a presenter. No one deserves that type of treatment, yet it was a characteristic Zito move... Pam Wimberly was the core of M-A's athletic program for years and was instrumental in putting M-A on the map for several D1 high school sports. I agree with KAM....she deserves a balloon-filled auditorium exit. Perhaps the parents of athletes that truly shined under her as well as those that took their game to the next level, which she ALWAYS encouraged and supported, can organize a respectable send-off from an awesome career. To JUST teach P.E. in the fall is an embarrassment to her career.


Pat
Menlo Park: other
on Jun 9, 2012 at 12:41 pm
Pat, Menlo Park: other
on Jun 9, 2012 at 12:41 pm
2 people like this

Pat Wimberly definitely deserved better.
Isn't it amazing that the win-loss of a high school team is more important than the values, techniques and pride that can be taught via sports. I always felt sorry for coaches with so much publicity criticizing them for a team's loss. Most of academia's success is not published weekly. Public school educators work with the students that go out for the sport, they do not recruit, like the pros...think about it.
Pam was always the LADY while coaching,and over the years she has had some fiesty young atheletes to test Pam's patience, and she endured. Good luck to her in the future


Fresh Perspective
Atherton: West Atherton
on Jun 9, 2012 at 4:28 pm
Fresh Perspective, Atherton: West Atherton
on Jun 9, 2012 at 4:28 pm
Like this comment

Ms. Wimberly is a grump. My daughter was an All-League M-A athlete. Whenever I had to interact with her as the "Athletic Director", she left me frustrated by her arrogance. She was on a power trip with a chip on her shoulder. It's time for a fresh perspective on all fronts.


Disappointed M-A Grad
Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jun 9, 2012 at 5:55 pm
Disappointed M-A Grad, Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jun 9, 2012 at 5:55 pm
2 people like this

Very disappointed in my alma mater for being this way towards Ms. Wimberly. She and Coach Parks were legendary coaches who put their hearts/souls into the programs. They put their lives into their work. They did so much for me personally as a person and in my life. She deserves a better end even if it is time.


M-A parent
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 9, 2012 at 7:09 pm
M-A parent, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 9, 2012 at 7:09 pm
Like this comment

I agree with Fresh Perspective. One of my children had a dreadful experience with her as a coach. Wimberly has her favorites, and if she doesn't like a kid, she can be cruel. Another child just finished a year with her as a PE teacher and there were plenty of stories about her failure to manage her class. I found her brusque, unapproachable, and humorless. From everything I've observed and heard, she's well past her pull-date.


You've Got To Be Kidding Me
Menlo Park: other
on Jun 9, 2012 at 8:41 pm
You've Got To Be Kidding Me, Menlo Park: other
on Jun 9, 2012 at 8:41 pm
Like this comment

Ms. Wimberly is a legend and has been setting an example for the young women on her teams and other coaches for years. Her firing shows the power of white, overprivileged players' parents. Principal Zito should be ashamed of himself, kow-towing to such pressures. You know who you are out there. 2012-2013 will be no better for your undertalented daughters.


M-A parent
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 9, 2012 at 9:25 pm
M-A parent, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 9, 2012 at 9:25 pm
Like this comment

Oh, please, not that tired ole race card.

Parents often complain about their kids' high school coaches, and ADs tend to dismiss a lot of those complaints as noise. If parental complaints were truly a factor in her dismissal, they must have been loud, abundant, and on target.

I heard rumors that she was retiring after the new gym was built, and that was maybe 10 years ago? She should have left gracefully then. She chose to stay and made this kind of ignominious exit inevitable.


reality check
Menlo-Atherton High School
on Jun 11, 2012 at 12:43 pm
reality check, Menlo-Atherton High School
on Jun 11, 2012 at 12:43 pm
Like this comment

Anything you are hearing about her dismissal is coming from her. The school can't talk about employees, so please keep in mind that you are only hearing one side! When Joe says that she should have been allowed to retire....I'm sure that was the school's first choice! It's more than time for her to gracefully leave. My children's experience in regular PE with her was that she couldn't care less about them and treated the whole PE class horribly....and that was many years ago. Time for her to retire and not inflict her anger on more students!


Jenny Circle
Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jun 11, 2012 at 4:22 pm
Jenny Circle, Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jun 11, 2012 at 4:22 pm
Like this comment

"While no one wanted to state the obvious, going 10-16 this past season and 7-18 in 2010-11 while missing the CCS playoffs both times reportedly did not enamor Wimberly with a group of M-A parents who evidently wanted more. It was a clash of style over substance and the supposed weight of parental pressure apparently won out."

Shame on these parents and the decision to end Pam's coaching career. I've known Pam for over twenty years - She's a class act and these kids couldn't be in better hands. It's too bad that going to the CCS playoffs are more of a priority than Pam's influence of shaping these kids to become great athletes and even better people. They wanted more? I'm dissappointed in all of this. I'm sure I speak for all the girls who have played for you/against you and those who have coached with you.



M-A parent
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 11, 2012 at 4:41 pm
M-A parent, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 11, 2012 at 4:41 pm
Like this comment

Everyone keeps referring to Wimberly as a "class act." I'm not sure what that's supposed to mean? That she can be polite to adults when she needs to be? As reality check points out, the kids in her classes describe a teacher who doesn't treat students very well. Nothing horrible, like physical abuse. Just garden variety incompetence and disregard for kids' feelings and level of learning.

I understand from my child that the girls on her team are thrilled that she is not coming back. Don't they count? I personally don't care if my kids' teams win a single game if they learn something, stay safe, and have fun. When you have a coach who doesn't communicate well with the players, isn't teaching them any skills, and is making them unhappy, the win-lose record is just the coup de grace.

Good decision, Mr. Zito. It took courage, but a lot of us parents will back you up 100%.


M-A Alum
Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jun 12, 2012 at 12:27 pm
M-A Alum, Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jun 12, 2012 at 12:27 pm
Like this comment

The problem with many MA parents is that they dont see their children as a problem, ever. There are ways to play the game, there are ways to teach the game- regardless of the sport. Mrs. Wimberly has been the same person now as she was 25+ yrs ago when my brother and I were students- as students we didnt care for her - and we felt she had a certain disdain for all students that were not hers.
I was fortunate enough to coach at MA years later, and could still see that hint of arrogance, but she really did care... about the players of all sports, the students in all classes and the coaches.
Her job was to coach and mold young people - and it is the students/ players jobs to learn how to play, and learn how to take direction, no matter how the message is delivered.
When your kids get jobs somewhere, have fun telling their bosses you dont like the way they manage, cut the cord and watch your children grow on their own.


M-A Parent
Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jun 12, 2012 at 1:09 pm
M-A Parent, Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jun 12, 2012 at 1:09 pm
Like this comment

Well said M-A Alum.


bob
Woodside: other
on Jun 12, 2012 at 1:13 pm
bob, Woodside: other
on Jun 12, 2012 at 1:13 pm
Like this comment

Great so now we will have parents and kids deciding who coaches. From my perspective the parents that complain usually are upset because their child is not playing enough and the coach is the problem. No coach is perfect, parents are the problem with kid's athletics. Every parent wants the best for their children, however athletics is like the real world kids that are talented and work hard get to play, talent alone doesn't cut it.


Dermot Cronin (asst coach Mills basketball
Menlo-Atherton High School
on Jun 12, 2012 at 1:25 pm
Dermot Cronin (asst coach Mills basketball, Menlo-Atherton High School
on Jun 12, 2012 at 1:25 pm
Like this comment

I'm not sure of the reasoning behind theecision, but I will miss coaching against Coach Wimberly. Her teams were always well coached and prepared and personally gave us tough games regardless of the records. 3 years ago her team was in the Nor Cals. The last 3 they played in the toughest division of the PAL.

I didn't always like my coaches at the time but looking back I'm glad they didn't coddle me. They prepared me for the real world the way coach Wiberly does. When I see tbem now I thank them for their guidance. I would just like to thank Coach Wimberly for the years of great service to the kids and the game!


M-A parent
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 12, 2012 at 2:07 pm
M-A parent, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 12, 2012 at 2:07 pm
Like this comment

Please keep in mind that this is high school. The players are students, not professionals. They are at school to help shape their development and to grow. So yes, a coach who is not serving the needs of the players -- to acquire technique, to learn teamwork, to polish interpersonal skills -- should not be in that job. Students are the only constituency that matters. Not alums, not neighbors, not friends from 30 years ago.

It's a pathetic cop-out to portray M-A parents as selfish and unaware of the bigger picture. I valued the high school teachers who held me to a high standard and made me work harder. So when my kids get coaches and teachers who let them know they aren't perfect and direct them to improve, I am thrilled.

But there is a huge difference between a coach/teacher who can give a lazy or underperforming child a push in a manner that is constructive and caring and a coach/teacher who has a massive chip on the shoulder and whose coaching/teaching is tainted by his/her own personal demons. As parents, we would be remiss if we did not complain about coaches who cursed at or deliberately humiliated our children. And the administration would be remiss to ignore inappropriate coaching behavior.

I have had to fire people, and I know how tough it is. Wimberly is lucky that she still has a job. I have not been one of the complainers, but if my child is assigned to her class again, I will be among those who protest.


Mel
Atherton: Lloyden Park
on Jun 12, 2012 at 11:01 pm
Mel, Atherton: Lloyden Park
on Jun 12, 2012 at 11:01 pm
Like this comment

I have always let my kids play and the coaches coach. You claim that Wimberly fails to acquire technique, to learn teamwork, to polish interpersonal skills of her players? Why don't you ask any of the 150+ girls who played for her over the last forty two years about that - however, current students are the only constituents that count? That's a bold statement.

Menlo park parents selfish and unaware of the bigger picture? Hey, you said it- Not all of them, there are many on here that feel the same way as I do - I know several M-A parents that respect Pam and I am sure there are on here voicing their support. MA alum said it well. Cut the cord. They aren't going to grow up unless you let them.




M-A parent
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 13, 2012 at 9:05 am
M-A parent, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 13, 2012 at 9:05 am
Like this comment

I haven't seen any evidence that students are being coddled, but rather, evidence that they are being heard and respected. Is that a bad thing?

And yes, today's students deserve a competent, caring coach. It doesn't do them a whit of good to have a coach who was great 40 years ago and is so self-absorbed that she doesn't realize her own shortcomings. Is that the message we want to send our kids: "you don't matter -- it's all about allowing a paid employee to achieve her personal goals"???


Dan
Menlo Park: other
on Jun 13, 2012 at 11:56 am
Dan, Menlo Park: other
on Jun 13, 2012 at 11:56 am
Like this comment

Without any examples of Coach Wimberly's verbal abuse or "personal demons" it's hard to fathom this action. If she was as bad as being stated how is she keeping her job at the school? Doesn't compute.
Coach Wimberly's track record speaks for itself. In my dealings with her she is nothing but classy and ready to lend a hand. She is 2 years removed from being the "CCS honor coach"
Shame on the administration!


Sofaia, former player
another community
on Jun 30, 2012 at 9:30 am
Sofaia, former player, another community
on Jun 30, 2012 at 9:30 am
Like this comment

Coach Wimberly was instrumental in assisting Tofi and I (better known as the "Twin Towers")with the opportunity to visit colleges in central and southern California towards the end of our senior year. At graduation I still did not know where I was going to school in the fall. If it hadn't been for her direction and caring spirit our road to obtain athletic scholarships at the next level would have been long and arduous. She knew we needed to go to college away from home if we were going to have a fighting chance. I was brought up with my mom telling me to always thank the people who have helped me in life along the way. There are so many ways in which Wimberly aided in shaping my future. When I come home to visit I usually try to stop by Coach Wimberly's office to say "hi", catch up, and thank her.

Even if the administration felt they needed to make a transition I feel it could have been handled better by telling her at the beginning of the school year versus the end. With all that she has accomplished and all of the lives she has positively impacted they could of least extended her that courtesy, but that's just my two cents.

Mrs. Wimberly thank you again for caring enough to steer me in the right direction when I was falling apart my senior year. If it wasn't for your leadership and patience who knows what would have become of me.




M-A parent
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 30, 2012 at 3:02 pm
M-A parent, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 30, 2012 at 3:02 pm
Like this comment

According to google, Sofaia and Tofi graduated almost 20 years ago. I am happy that these women have such wonderful memories of high school. Shouldn't today's students be allowed to have a similarly fulfilling and productive experience? It's pretty clear to almost everyone associated with M-A in 2012 that Wimberly was at best ineffective in the role of coach. And it's too bad that she did not choose to make the decision to step down herself, before it became obvious to all that a change was necessary.

Why is she still teaching? Probably because it's almost impossible to fire a teacher who has tenure. M-A has a lot of great long-time teachers, but no one should be guaranteed a job for life. We can thank the California Teachers Assocation for the damage that mediocre tenured teachers continue to inflict on our kids.


wanda sadler
Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jan 9, 2013 at 1:05 pm
wanda sadler, Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jan 9, 2013 at 1:05 pm
2 people like this

I was in town my mind fell on my friend and coach i was class of 75 we played a many of games together. Theres no better preson she took me to the stars and held me there.
she is a true friend. Wanda


MA Alum '79
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Aug 25, 2013 at 10:18 pm
MA Alum '79, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Aug 25, 2013 at 10:18 pm
Like this comment

Let's say for discussion purposes that it was time for Coach Wimberly to step aside from her coaching duties - and I'm not saying it was - there is no justification for the way it was handled. Someone of her stature and accomplishment deserved a respectful handling of the transition. Shame of Zito and whoever in the administration supported his handling of the situation. No matter what the situation, there is no reason for such a slight.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.