News


Update: Filoli executive talks about moving past recent turmoil

Expanded story on interview with Cynthia D'Agosta and Heidi Brown

Note: This is an expanded version of an earlier story. With the permission of Ms. Brown and Ms. D'Agosta the interview was recorded.

By Barbara Wood | Almanac Staff Writer


Filoli Executive Director Cynthia D'Agosta. (Photo by Michelle Le/The Almanac.)
Nearly six weeks after she first declined interviews with the Almanac, Filoli's executive director, Cynthia D'Agosta agreed to an interview at Filoli on March 26 to discuss how those at the historic estate are working to move past the recent turmoil.

Ms. D'Agosta said 1,060 active volunteers had signed a controversial volunteer agreement by March 27, along with 28 inactive emeritus volunteers and 14 volunteers who are on leave. That means at least 240 of 1,300 active volunteers declined to sign the mandatory agreement and have left Filoli since the March 1 signing deadline.

Ms. D'Agosta said 80 who have left were part of a group that leads students on nature walks at Filoli, but that program has not been cut. A volunteer said the nature docents who have left account for more than 250 collective years of experience.

In the interview, Ms. D'Agosta said that while Filoli does plan at some point to revise the volunteer agreement with a new release of liability clause, it will not happen in the near future. "Given our current workload and projection of what needs to get done this year, we're not going to revisit that for a while," she said.

In mid-February, a number of Filoli volunteers contacted the Almanac to express distress over the volunteer agreement they had been told they had to sign by March 1 to keep their volunteer jobs. At that point, according to an email from Filoli management, only 600 volunteers had signed.

After the Almanac posted a story about the controversy, Filoli's governing board met and said volunteers could cross out the most objectionable clause, which states volunteers will not make "a claim of any negligence, personal injury, wrongful death or property damage against Filoli" in connection with the volunteer's work at Filoli.

Ms. D'Agosta emphasized that volunteers do myriad tasks at Filoli. A count of volunteers working during a recent week at Filoli ranged from 27 to 93 each day, depending on what was going on at the estate that day.

A recent volunteer newsletter said that in 2014, volunteers donated 103,769 hours to Filoli, the equivalent of 50 full-time employees. The newsletter valued the time of the employees (at $26.34 an hour) at $2.7 million.

That means that the volunteers who have left Filoli, if they worked the bare minimum number of annual hours required of volunteers, 30 hours a year, would be equivalent to the loss of at least $189,648. Volunteers must also be members, which costs at least $50 a year at the senior rate; meaning Filoli will lose at least another $12,000 in memberships.

In the March 26 interview, Ms. D'Agosta, said that the loss of the volunteers has been an "emotional hardship." "I'm not discounting the dollars or the hours, I'm just saying that in terms of what we're dealing with, that has been the most significant impact," she said.

Ms. D'Agosta said that work on a volunteer agreement began about four years ago, before she was hired in late 2012. The governing board asked for a volunteer agreement because "there was not an official way for the organization to remedy a situation when we had a volunteer who was ... putting others in danger," she said.

"They felt that the volunteer agreement was a way to get at that and to clarify the relationship," between volunteers and the organization, she said.

While the intent may have been to put in place a disciplinary procedure, the final agreement says nothing about such a process, Ms. D'Agosta admits. "Over time, it took a very different turn," she said.

Through changes in Filoli's governing board, volunteer leadership and administration over those four years, many different people worked on the agreement and "things lose their initial intent over time -- they lose their context," she said.

"When I came into it, what I brought to the table were examples of other agreements," she said. "They hadn't really looked at what other organizations do."

Heidi Brown, who became the president of the Friends of Filoli only in November, and Ms. D'Agosta "both were handed this document, basically, to implement," she said.

"This was a collective decision of management," Ms. D'Agosta said. "This was not something I put down when I got here and said, 'This needs to happen.'"

When asked why, after so much time without an agreement, the executive board insisted on going ahead even after it was clear that there was much opposition, Ms. D'Agosta said, "I'm not sure; I'm honestly not sure."

In recent years, many changes have taken place at Filoli, where there have been five executive directors in 10 years, Ms. D'Agosta said. "That amount of change is hard on the staff; it's been hard on the volunteers. Sometimes I feel that what we're dealing with is just that whole aspect of change," she said.

"That is one of the factors that I have to take into consideration when we have to rebound from an event like we just had with the volunteer agreement," she said. "What you're seeing is the vocal volunteers. But there are thousands of people behind them who have to be protected from what is being said and what's being thrown out there," she said.

With the help of the Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center, a San Mateo-based nonprofit, Ms. Brown, Ms. D'Agosta and governing board President Toni Barrack have been holding a series of what they call "facilitated discussions" with groups of about two dozen volunteers at a time. Seven of the two-hour sessions had been planned or held at the time of the interview, but Ms. D'Agosta said "we will continue to add (sessions) until there's no more requests."

"We're making it a place where people are free to speak their minds," she said. "People coming out of the meetings have said thank you, this has been very helpful, very useful and that they felt better."

Ms. D'Agosta said that the fact that many Filoli volunteers see the organization as a family "adds to the complexity" of dealing with the problems the organization has experienced. "Each step that we take has to be very well thought out," she said. "It's like dealing with a four-year-old who just doesn't understand why he can't touch that flower. It's at that level. It is."

Ms. D'Agosta said she had refused to comment until that day in part out of frustration "with a lot of things that were going on -- not just what was bring printed, but the challenges here that we were dealing with. And it wasn't so much about you or about what you were doing, it was about what was being said that was so frustrating," she said. "By talking to you I wasn't necessarily going to get to talk to those people," she said. "

"I didn't see at that time that it was going to benefit us in any way," to talk to the Almanac, she said. "I didn't trust where it was going to go and what was going to happen."

"We then went in and started working internally instead," she said.

Now, however, "the fog is lifting," she said. "Management has been able to come together, decide a path. We're working on it. What's included in that is re-establishment of the relationship with the Almanac."

Heidi Brown, who also participated in part of the March 26 interview, said "it was very difficult being silent. But we had to get it right."

In the March 26 interview, Ms. Brown and Ms. D'Agosta denied a number of rumors that volunteers had conveyed to the Almanac.

She denied, for example, that Filoli is suffering from financial problems and because of that has had each department cut expenses by 10 percent, canceled the garden's intern and apprentice programs and canceled training for nature docents.

Ms. D'Agosta said there have been no departmental cuts, and that the internship program didn't take place in the spring because there weren't enough candidates. Ms. Brown said the nature docent training was canceled because "we actually had so many docents that we weren't getting as many hikes (to lead) as we wanted to."

Both said Filoli treasures its nature education program and has no plans to discontinue it. "I think quite the opposite," said Ms. Brown. "Filoli's proud of that education program and that's our mission."

A review of Filoli's income tax forms, which must be publicly filed because the organization is tax-exempt, show that in 2013, the last year for which tax forms were filed, Filoli had $5.7 million in income from gifts, grants, contributions and membership fees ($1.1 million) and admissions, merchandise sold, services or facilities furnished ($4.6 million).

That year Ms. D'Agosta made $172,219, and the organization had 31 members of its governing body (who are not compensated), 82 employees and 1,442 volunteers.

The tax forms are also available for 2011 and 2012. They show that Ms. D'Agosta's predecessor as executive director, Jane Risser, made $185,000 in 2011 and that she was paid $165,000 in severance pay when she left in 2012.

In an effort to learn from other successful similar organizations, Filoli is sending two employees and Ms. Brown to Longwood Gardens in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where about 800 people volunteer, Ms. D'Agosta said. "They are a volunteer organization that works well with management, so we are going to learn from them," she said.

After the interview, Ms. D'Agosta gave the Almanac a prepared statement, sent by Larry Kamer, whose Oakland-based crisis communications management company, Kamer Consulting Group, has been working for Filoli since the dispute over the volunteer agreement went public in late February.

"As executive director of Filoli, I will be the first to admit that we could have done a better job in laying the groundwork for the introduction of the volunteer agreement last December, and for that I apologize to those volunteers who saw this as somehow demeaning their work or their contributions to Filoli," she wrote.

In the statement Ms. D'Agosta characterizes those who gave up their volunteer jobs rather than sign the new agreement as "a small but vocal group."

"But even when our board agreed to drop the provision that was the most divisive -- a liability waiver similar to those used by countless other organizations to reduce the risk of frivolous litigation -- a small but vocal group of advocates has continued to insist that the very introduction of a volunteer agreement is an insult to the volunteer corps," she writes.

She did thank those who have left Filoli for their earlier work. "We will continue to honor their service, and we thank them for their invaluable contributions to the success of Filoli," she wrote. "But historic preservation is as much about the future as it is about the past, and we can't secure that future without strong systems and policies in place. The overwhelming membership of our volunteer corps has recognized this, and we will continue to honor them and support them as we move forward. They are the future of this important historic site."

While some have called for Ms. D'Agosta's firing or resignation, she says she is staying. "I don't plan on going anyplace," she said. "We want to settle this and get back to what we love."

Comments

30 people like this
Posted by Bob
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Mar 27, 2015 at 12:50 pm

There is still a bad smell on this issue with many unanswered questions.

"When asked why, after so much time without an agreement, the executive board insisted on going ahead even after it was clear that there was much opposition to the agreement that was presented, Ms. Agosta said, "'I honestly am not sure.'" -- sounds like an uninformed executive director; she should have found a better way to answer that question than "I'm not sure."

I know of a few retired couples who had considered volunteering at Filoli, but once this controversy arose looked elsewhere to donate their time.


42 people like this
Posted by Former volunteer
a resident of Woodside: other
on Mar 27, 2015 at 1:08 pm

So, after reading the interview with the current Executive Director, who doesn't have a clear understanding of the Volunteer Agreement and can not explain why the Governing Board went ahead and "pushed it through" despite many questions from volunteers, what is the next step?
Hopefully, an interview with the Head of the Governing Board.
Please do not give up Barbara Wood. Thank you for your diligence.


34 people like this
Posted by Former volunteer
a resident of Woodside: other
on Mar 27, 2015 at 1:17 pm

After reading the interview with the current Executive Director, I hope Barbara Wood is planning to interview the Head of the Governing Board. Cynthia D'Agosta does not seem to understand the the Volunteer Agreement nor can she explain why the Governing Board "pushed it through" when there were so many questions from hundreds of volunteers. I see why she asks a Public Relations firm to speak for her.


16 people like this
Posted by pearl
a resident of another community
on Mar 27, 2015 at 1:53 pm

pearl is a registered user.

Z-ZZ-ZZ-z-z-z-z-z-z-z... No matter, folks...things at Filoli will never again be the same. : (


22 people like this
Posted by Water
a resident of another community
on Mar 27, 2015 at 3:32 pm

Water is a registered user.

I was in the process of becoming a volunteer and this debacle put the kibosh on that. Controversy follows her around. I am very sorry for the many who've put in multiple hours over the years, only to have this happen.

How hard would it have been not to interfere with something that did work pretty well? I've both been a volunteer and a volunteer coordinator, and while it can be a tricky balance to make it all work, Filoli had it working according to their values, philosophy and style. The carrot has traditionally been that it's a prestigious place to volunteer, but if one cares little about status, that's no reward. And clearly, some rewards aren't enough for what was expected of the vols.


39 people like this
Posted by Say What?
a resident of Menlo Park: Sharon Heights
on Mar 27, 2015 at 3:52 pm

So, the Almanac received a letter over the signature of Cynthia D'Agosta but mailed from (and presumably written by) her "crisis management company". Then when she finally got up the courage to sit for an interview at the Almanac, she was unable to answer key questions and even pretended that the Volunteer Agreement originated four years ago before she arrived at this job. Were that true, why was the Filoli staff member, who introduced the VA document at each volunteer committee meeting this season, telling volunteers that it originated just last year following "two unfortunate episodes involving volunteers" after which Filoli felt a need to protect itself from litigious volunteers. The story seems to have conveniently changed now to relieve Ms D'Agosta of an anti-volunteer appearance. There's still a bad smell hovering around Filoli that won't be dispersed until the present leadership is replaced. Many of us, including The Almanac, know that.


39 people like this
Posted by ex volunteer
a resident of another community
on Mar 27, 2015 at 5:04 pm

As one of the "small but verbal group" I have to complement Cynthia for her ability to sidestep, speak without saying anything, and avoiding one of the biggest problems at his point: the prevailing feelings of unhappiness and distrust that she has created and has allowed to fester and grow. This is very much a situation of too little, too late. I know of NO COMPETANT director that would EVER have allowed this to happen! She is so out of touch, she doesn't know or understand what is going on. It is obviously time for Cynthia to step aside.


30 people like this
Posted by Volunteer
a resident of Atherton: other
on Mar 27, 2015 at 6:56 pm

Aside from sidestepping the answers or giving no answers to questions, the executive director of Filoli is disingenuous in stating that a "vocal" group of volunteers wanted no agreement at all, and she is disingenuous when stating that she had no input into the content of the agreement.
The "vocal" volunteers would have gladly signed an agreement that was reasonable and respectful. The agreement, even with the most noxious clause removed, is still insulting to the vast majority of volunteers, especially when they were told to sign the agreement or lose their privileges, and then the agreement then states that it was signed "without any duress".


12 people like this
Posted by Howard
a resident of another community
on Mar 27, 2015 at 7:04 pm

These kinds of agreements are routine and necessary. Move on people.


9 people like this
Posted by Regular Volunteer
a resident of another community
on Mar 28, 2015 at 7:22 am

Preach Howard. Based on the "ex volunteer" comments they have partial knowledge of the agreement. Both Heidi, Cynthia, and Toni have stated that the Agreement was worked on years in advance yet they still refuse to believe, understand, and accept that maybe they are telling the truth. I have seen some discussions about the agreement take place and I think that maybe the problem is with those volunteers not Filoli. Just my opinion not a fact so don't go repeating that now. Fioli is still an amazing and special place.


39 people like this
Posted by Active Volunteer
a resident of Woodside: Woodside Hills
on Mar 28, 2015 at 9:59 am

It's surprising that Ms. D'Agosta continues to think the only a "small" number of volunteers have concerns about how the Volunteer Agreement was crafted and rolled-out. Barbara Wood accurately states the actual numbers of people who didn't initially sign, more than half of the entire volunteer community.

Another false argument that Ms. D'Agosta repeats is that the community didn't want an agreement. Many of us think that an agreement is reasonable, but one that was created with input from the entire community and that reflects both volunteer and Filoli management perspectives.

Finally, Ms. D'Agosta likes to deny responsibility for the uproar that has been caused by her actions. When asked "why...the executive board insisted on going ahead even after it was clear that there was much opposition to the agreement," she says that she's "not sure." She's either not talking to her management, or she wants to shift the blame to them. Regardless, she doesn't come across well. It's time for her to find new employment elsewhere. It's also time, as others have said, to interview members of the board.


30 people like this
Posted by kaaren volunteer
a resident of another community
on Mar 28, 2015 at 10:39 am

As someone with many years of non-profit experience, as as an agency volunteer coordinator, Board of Directors President, and as a volunteer, I find Filoli to be particularly opaque in its dealings with volunteers. Yesterday I attended a Filoli Crisis Management meeting for docents facilitated by the crisis managers. No one at the top, Executive Director, President of the Board of Directors, or President of Friends of Filoli was able to be responsive to any of the numerous questions and concerns.

There is a federal Volunteer Protection Act (105-19) as well as a California law protecting volunteers from liability. Both might allay some of the concerns that volunteers have, if anyone in the organization bothered to spread this information.


33 people like this
Posted by lapsing member
a resident of Portola Valley: other
on Mar 28, 2015 at 2:41 pm

We are not renewing our membership until meaningful and corrective administrative action has been taken by the Trust. It is unreasonable for any organization to expect continued support (both time and money)from the membership given the incompetence of the current leadership at Filoli. By how much will membership dues be increased to pay the costs of continued crises management intervention?


35 people like this
Posted by pogo
a resident of Woodside: other
on Mar 28, 2015 at 3:04 pm

pogo is a registered user.

If the Filoli board hasn't fired their Executive Director after this fiasco and botched job, one must assume they endorse her actions.


38 people like this
Posted by Jay Park
a resident of another community
on Mar 28, 2015 at 8:51 pm

She failed. She lost a quarter of Filoli's volunteers.

Read the last paragraph of the post. She isn't even sure why they ramrodded this thing despite all the opposition. She has been at her post for two years and she's still clueless as how the Filoli community operates.


21 people like this
Posted by neighbor
a resident of another community
on Mar 30, 2015 at 11:03 am

First, Palo Online -- what happened to Palo Alto neighborhoods in the selection box???? This issue extends way beyond the communities listed, so I'm assuming this was an error.

Secondly, her crisis management firm is not helping her. To minimize the concerns by stating that only a "small group" left Filoli is incredible. She lost 20% overall and 33% of one program. My idea of "small" is around 5%. This firm has also failed by not recommending a FULL apology and acceptance of responsibility rather than the tepid statement provided. People are usually forgiving when they believe an apology is sincere and lessons were learned -- that's what allows everyone to move forward.


1 person likes this
Posted by neighbor
a resident of another community
on Mar 30, 2015 at 11:05 am

Sorry, Almanac == I just realized this was your post and hence the reason for the community list. I clicked on the story through Palo Alto online and assumed it was their story.


8 people like this
Posted by Volunteer
a resident of Atherton: other
on Mar 30, 2015 at 1:48 pm

It seems that the leadership at Filoli thinks of the volunteers as signers or nonsigners. However, among nonsigners is a large group who have no grudge with the volunteer agreement with the cross out option. Their reluctance to sign has to do with the treatment they received ...no opportunity to dialogue, sign or resign. It made them feel undervalued and unappreciated. Invite them back, apologize for ignoring their need to meet. Many want to come back and we want them back.


21 people like this
Posted by Carol Gilbert
a resident of another community
on Mar 30, 2015 at 2:44 pm

Gee, I think "Hasta la vista" might be in order for the Exec Director.


30 people like this
Posted by Former Nature Ed Volunteer
a resident of Portola Valley: other
on Mar 30, 2015 at 8:16 pm

This woman never ceases to amaze me. For instance, "It's like dealing with a four-year-old who just doesn't understand why he can't touch that flower…" How insulting is that!

I suggest that Ms. D'Agosta wear a muzzle to her next interview.


23 people like this
Posted by Concerned Volunteer
a resident of Woodside: Family Farm/Hidden Valley
on Mar 31, 2015 at 9:46 am

Ms D’Agosta has reached a new low. Patronizing volunteers “who have to be protected from what is being said and what's being thrown out there" by “vocal volunteers” (i.e., anyone with a point of view that differs from hers) isn’t a particularly clever way to show respect for the people who donated $2.7M in labor in 2014. She talks about improving communication with volunteers, but clearly doesn’t understand that communication is a 2-way exchange and that there should at least be an attempt at diplomacy. "It's like dealing with a four-year-old who just doesn't understand why he can't touch that flower” is a statement that doesn’t bode well for collaborative give-and-take and certainly blows diplomacy out of the water. This person is embarrassing Filoli. Will the Governing Board continue to allow her to destroy the good will that existed before she came?


21 people like this
Posted by Margaretha
a resident of Atherton: other
on Mar 31, 2015 at 9:58 am

How insulting to the volunteers! Ms D'Agosta says ""It's like dealing with a four-year-old who just doesn't understand why he can't touch that flower. It's at that level. It is." Really, it's at that level? And she feels there "are thousands of people behind them who have to be protected from what is being said and what's being thrown out there," So now she's the "protector" of the poor childish volunteers. Gee thanks.

The article says this is an apology, but all I see is MsD'Agosta "apologizing" because she didn't explain the agreement better. That's like "apologizing" because we're too stupid to get it.

The spin she has tried to put on this is insulting to all the volunteers and member of Filoli. Please remember that this is an unusually well informed and educated group, and do not deserve to be treated like recalcitrant children.


7 people like this
Posted by Margaretha
a resident of Atherton: other
on Mar 31, 2015 at 10:45 am

History repeats itself:

"Cynthia D'Agosta, who has led the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority (JPA) since 2000, has resigned her sometimes contentious post to become executive director of the Committee for Green Foothills, effective May 1....D'Agosta's decision to hire her nephew, Kevin Murray, as project manager sparked controversy when the board learned about it several years later."
Web Link

See the list of comments from the public this news article generated in 2008. $150,000 wardrobe???

How did she get hired by the Filoli board if they were aware of this?


2 people like this
Posted by Volunteer
a resident of another community
on Mar 31, 2015 at 11:36 am

The Filoli volunteer agreement is supported by not only the current Friends of Filoli board, whose members include several past FoF presidents, plus the governing board and, if I'm not mistaken, the board of the National Trust.


13 people like this
Posted by pogo
a resident of Woodside: other
on Mar 31, 2015 at 12:15 pm

pogo is a registered user.

Margretha asks "How did she get hired by the Filoli board if they were aware of this?"

At this point, one has to assume that the Filoli board endorses the actions of their executive director.

There is no other explanation. Accept it.


13 people like this
Posted by Liz
a resident of Menlo Park: Sharon Heights
on Mar 31, 2015 at 12:19 pm

The best way to move past this is for Cynthia to resign.


2 people like this
Posted by South.of.Midtown
a resident of another community
on Mar 31, 2015 at 3:34 pm

[Post removed; repeat comment from poster using more than one name in same thread.]


9 people like this
Posted by 8yr. volunteer
a resident of another community
on Mar 31, 2015 at 5:15 pm

MANY volunteers signed under duress. Sign or "go home".

Ms D'Agosta could "mend fences" and show true leadership by doing two things: 1) personally (not PR firm) write and send a letter to all volunteers with a sincere "thank you" for their past,present and future donation of their time and talents to Filoli and 2) reach out to all the volunteers who have not signed and ask them to return to the Filoli family.

PS - I have heard her brother is now on Filoli's staff.


1 person likes this
Posted by pogo
a resident of Woodside: other
on Mar 31, 2015 at 7:27 pm

pogo is a registered user.

1. Why would a volunteer sign under duress? That seems completely antithetical to the idea behind "volunteering." You volunteer because you WANT to do something, not because someone FORCES you.

2. Ms. D'Agosta is not going to apologize. Filoli's board selected her and her actions are endorsed by them. Accept it.


14 people like this
Posted by Volunteer
a resident of Atherton: other
on Mar 31, 2015 at 8:37 pm

To Pogo:
A volunteer would sign under duress because she or he had invested a lot of time into Filoli, loves Filoli, and rationally wants to overlook the bad treatment received from the Filoli management. It is by now clear that the governing board of Filoli is ultimately to blame for most of the recent problems, as it appears to fully back up Ms. D'Agosta and her actions. Ms. D'Agosta is absolutely right when she refuses to talk to the media, because every time she does speak, her message is an insult to the volunteers, or she pretends ignorance, or is plain disingenuous. It is indeed better for her to keep silent...


2 people like this
Posted by kaaren volunteer
a resident of another community
on Apr 1, 2015 at 9:13 am

It would be nice to move on, institutionally.

All the posts and my own experience indicate that neither the Executive Director or the President of Friends of Filoli (the volunteer arm) have much in the way of social skills. We just have to accept that. I might suggest that they each read a good guide to working with volunteers.

Speaking as a volunteer, each of us gets their own sense of reward from the activity. The long time volunteers are closely identified with Filoli and are responsible, in the context of an unusual turnover of executive directors over the last ten years (what in the world is the Board doing?) for the smooth running of Filoli. Of course they are aggrieved by being run over.

As the Executive Director says, all the docents are being met with in small groups. I would hope that these meetings result in a clearly written working document, SENT TO ALL DOCENTS, about next steps.


Like this comment
Posted by pogo
a resident of Woodside: other
on Apr 1, 2015 at 12:46 pm

pogo is a registered user.

volunteer -

I definitely understand the reason we volunteer. I also volunteer quite a bit ... not at Filoli, however.

Appreciation is often a critical element for personal satisfaction, perhaps the KEY component when volunteering. And the minute I feel my contributions are not appreciated or taken for granted is my last minute there.

Quite frankly, if an organization would treat me badly, not value my efforts, or make my work unnecessarily complex or arduous, they are not worthy of my time or energy.

There are many worthy causes in our area. If Filoli wants to act this way, take your contributions to an organization that values them.


3 people like this
Posted by SteveC
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Apr 1, 2015 at 2:56 pm

SteveC is a registered user.

Too bad, so sad, time to move on. This subject is so done, stick me with a fork, it is done!


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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