News


New mixed-use complex finished in Menlo Park

 

Construction has finished on a 16-unit townhouse complex with a two-story office building of approximately 26,800 square feet, according to the city of Menlo Park.

Now owned by Hunter Storm Development, the 1.5-acre property originally belonged to the Beltramo family, which negotiated with the city to reduce the number of below-market-rate housing units required on the site from three down to one before selling the lot in 2012.

The townhomes front San Antonio Street, while the office building sits along El Camino Real.

— Sandy Brundage

Comments

6 people like this
Posted by whatever
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Apr 22, 2015 at 10:37 am

Typical MP gov't looking out for the developers and giving them every dollar they want.


Like this comment
Posted by morris brown
a resident of Menlo Park: Park Forest
on Apr 22, 2015 at 10:48 am

This is a very nice development and shows that building 4 and 5 story, very high density projects are certainly not necessary or wanted along El Camino in Menlo Park.

The project took much longer to completion, due to the downturn, but finally completed.

Greenheart and Stanford should take a look and learn from this project, as should the present Council.


5 people like this
Posted by really?
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Apr 23, 2015 at 8:47 am

really? is a registered user.

Two thoroughly ugly and unimaginative projects by Hunter. I'm told they have the Roger Reynold site as well- let's hold their feet over the coals and demand better!


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Posted by Betty T
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Apr 23, 2015 at 12:28 pm

Have the town houses been sold or rented out?


9 people like this
Posted by pearl
a resident of another community
on Apr 23, 2015 at 1:34 pm

pearl is a registered user.

"Now owned by Hunter Storm Development, the 1.5-acre property originally belonged to the Beltramo family, which negotiated with the city to reduce the number of below-market-rate housing units required on the site from three down to one before selling the lot in 2012."

Shame on the Beltramo family for getting the city to reduce the number of below-market-rate housing units on the site from three down to one!!! Shame, shame, shame!!! Area locals have been very good to the Beltramo family for years, making them rich by patronizing their on-site liquor store. The Beltramos don't need the money, but low-income seniors desperately need the housing, and could have used all three units instead of just one. I am ashamed of the Beltramos, as well as the city for caving in to the Beltramos’ stipulation to reduce the number of below-market-rate housing units in this development project from three to one!!! Yet another dark day for the city of Menlo Park. : (


8 people like this
Posted by bel no mo
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Apr 23, 2015 at 1:54 pm

All the more reason to go up the street to K&L, one of the truly fabulous wine stores in the country!


1 person likes this
Posted by Menlo Voter
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Apr 23, 2015 at 1:59 pm

Menlo Voter is a registered user.

pearl:

If my memory serves me the Beltramos paid in lieu of fees of $1 million to the city for the city to use to build below market rate housing. Ask the city what they've done with the money.


2 people like this
Posted by Morris Brown
a resident of Menlo Park: Park Forest
on Apr 23, 2015 at 3:28 pm

On the in lieu fee see:

Web Link

Complaining about lack of BMR units on this relativity low density / low height project in today's political environment, when the City Council being led by City Staff is on a path to convert MP into a community with high rise office and residential is simply ridiculous.

Using the now allowed zoning in the Specific Plan, the builder would probably build 4 and 5 story units, probably without any residential.

Hunter Properties has their heart set on 4 story units on the Roger Reynolds parcel, and Pollack wants to put a high rise hotel on a very small lot that was previously a Shell gas station; he even wants a rebate on the TOT.



2 people like this
Posted by High Rise Buildings in Menlo Park?
a resident of another community
on Apr 24, 2015 at 10:24 am

Morris, where are high rise building projects currently being proposed in Menlo Park?

Paragraph 3.3.36.7 of NFPA 101®, Life Safety Code, 2012 edition, defines a high-rise building as a building more than 75 feet (23 meters) in height, measured from the lowest level of fire department vehicle access to the floor of the highest occupiable story. A height of 75 feet translates into roughly seven stories.

Perhaps you are referring to the Greenheart development. No, that can't be as the proposed height is 48 feet.

Perhaps you are referring to the latest iteration of the Stanford Project. No, that can't be as the proposed height for all of the buildings but one is 48 ft, and the one of the buildings is 60ft.

Where exactly are these high rise buildings you are referring to?




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Posted by retired teacher
a resident of Menlo Park: Suburban Park/Lorelei Manor/Flood Park Triangle
on Apr 24, 2015 at 5:14 pm

The Gateway Project in Menlo Park will have a 171,000 square 11 story hotel. Three eight story office buildings equaling 700,000 square feet will follow. Two or three large parking structures are also planned but probably do not meet the definition of "high rise" buildings. This project is east of 101 not in downtown but certainly will impact all neighborhoods east of El Camino Real in Menlo Park.


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Posted by Roosevelt Greer
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on Apr 25, 2015 at 9:27 am

Morris, the council isn't being led by staff, they're being led by the VOTERS. Measure M's resounding loss, Menlo Gateway's overwhelming win, the sad showings by candidates like Chuck Bernstein, Kelly Fergusson, Vince Bressler, etc. etc. - how long will it take for you to accept reality? Can I suggest running for Council yourself, and putting your outdated views up for consideration?

And also- Hunter isn't proposing 4-story units on the Roger Reynolds parcel. Plans clearly show they're 3 levels max, just like your own Stone Pine townhomes:
Web Link
I know you're used to being misleading, but outright lying like that? That's a new low.


2 people like this
Posted by Morris Brown
a resident of Menlo Park: Park Forest
on Apr 25, 2015 at 10:27 am

@ Roosevelt Greer and others.

The proposed Hunter development shows a height to rooftop of 35 feet 9.5 in.

The Stone Pine Lane townhomes are split level and not three stories. My rooftop is 22 feet above sidewalk level. Now pray tell who is lying?

(Let me add the Park Forest townhomes all have access to private community parks/swimming pools. The overall level of density is much less than what Hunter is proposing to build.)

Current Council and Staff could care less about the quality of life for the residents of Menlo Park. Just build, build and build some more.

Palo Alto seems to have gained some sense (though not enough) with their election last November when the slow growth community supporters won many seats on council. Menlo Park used to have a reasonable council, but with the "big money" pouring in to support development at any cost, the local slow growth advocates have been over whelmed.

It will change in time. How long are residents going to put up with the terrible traffic? Right now at rush hour, it takes about 28 minutes to go from the Middlefield / Willow corner to the entrance of the Bayshore freeway (to go south). That trip during the non rush periods is about 6 minutes. As Facebook ramps up to over 13000 workers in the City, it will only get much worse. It is all completely out of control.

When Greenheart and buddies can spend over $200,000 against Measure M, and the City itself spends $165,000 for a study in concert to defeat Measure M, it is very tough to win at the ballot box. As I recall Bohannon spent over $400,000 to get approval for Measure T (Gateway).

No, I am not a candidate for council, nor will I ever be.

What is high rise for one city, may well not be high rise for others.

Most Menlo Park residents would consider the Schwab building on El Camino to be high rise, but it is only 48 feet in height.




2 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Apr 25, 2015 at 10:38 am

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"Right now at rush hour, it takes about 28 minutes to go from the Middlefield / Willow corner to the entrance of the Bayshore freeway (to go south). That trip during the non rush periods is about 6 minutes."

This is solid proof that "road diets" do not reduce traffic. This section of Willow used to be 4 lanes but intense lobbying resulted in the current configuration - and look what happened.

Just imagine what 28 minutes does to the response time of an emergency vehicle. "Road Diets" are unwise and can be deadly.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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