News


West Nile virus: Mosquito fogging tonight in Menlo Park

 

In response to the discovery of adult mosquitoes infected with West Nile virus in Menlo Park on July 29, the San Mateo County Mosquito & Vector Control District has scheduled an adult mosquito control fogging for the night of Sunday, Aug. 2, in areas of Menlo Park.

Here is a map of the treatment area.

For more information, visit www.smcmvcd.org or call (650) 344-8592 with questions or concerns.

Related story: Drought, warm weather increase concerns about West Nile virus.

Comments

1 person likes this
Posted by Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides
a resident of another community
on Jul 30, 2015 at 11:06 pm

Don't tell anyone, but the pesticide being used does not just kill mosquitoes. It will be our little secret. Just camp outside under the stars Sunday night. Bring your children and pets. Don't worry. Be happy.


Like this comment
Posted by fly swatter
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jul 31, 2015 at 9:01 am

@Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides

How would you prevent West Nile laden bugs?


3 people like this
Posted by Itcht
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Jul 31, 2015 at 1:53 pm

Umm, shouldn't they be making it a bit easier to find out what they're spraying? Not on the press release, not in the article.


Like this comment
Posted by Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides
a resident of another community
on Jul 31, 2015 at 3:05 pm

You can kill mosquitoes by nuking the city or spraying a pesticide such as the one being used. Zenevex E4. But more just mosquitoes are affected. See HealthyAlternativesToPesticides.com.


1 person likes this
Posted by TEG
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Jul 31, 2015 at 3:17 pm

I just called for more information and was told that the fogging will begin at 9 PM and end no later than 5 AM. She said they usually finish at one or 2 AM, but allow the extra hours in case there's some equipment malfunction. Keep pets (and obviously their food and water!) inside, and keep all windows closed that night.

Here's hoping it isn't another super hot day so I feel like I'm suffocating inside that night. But better to suffocate than be inhaling that poisonous stuff.


4 people like this
Posted by fly swatter
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jul 31, 2015 at 4:31 pm

@Healthy Alternatives To Pesticides

How would you prevent West Nile laden bugs? Just tell them to visit the website?

Okay.


3 people like this
Posted by Heathy Alternatives to Pesticides
a resident of another community
on Aug 1, 2015 at 2:10 am

First, West Nile virus is not carried by "bugs" generally but by some mosquitos. Second, West Nile virus is far less serious than the flu. Third, the Vector Control bureaucrats claim they found a few infected mosquitos. Fourth, the best way to reduce the population of mosquitos is before they leave the water. Indeed, without standing water, mosquitos are not born. Mosquitos also have natural preditors that are killed by a pesticide such as Zenevex E4. Bees die in their hives by "fogging" even at night. The pesticide is harmful to larger creatures as well - including pets and humans. It mixes with other pollutants - adding to the chemical soup that is deteriorating human health. It is now possible to genetically modify mosquitoes so they cannot carry diseases. Of course, modifying organisms may lead to vast and unanticipated changes in the eco-system. Much of the country avoids fogging. Around here, it is the first resort.


2 people like this
Posted by Tunbridge Wells
a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Aug 1, 2015 at 10:08 am

Tunbridge Wells is a registered user.

While it is true that for most people who contract West Nile the symptoms are mild or not even noticed, that is not the case for everyone. A small percentage of people who contract West Nile will develop meningitis or encephalitis, and some of those people will die. People over 60, people with diabetes, cancer, hypertension, kidney disease and transplant recipients are at greater risk.

So sure, it's "far less serious than the flu" except when it isn't.


5 people like this
Posted by Reader
a resident of another community
on Aug 1, 2015 at 3:33 pm

@fly swatter:

"How would you prevent West Nile laden bugs? Just tell them to visit the website?"

Actually, the website doesn't list any healthy alternatives to pesticides. It just calls for the halt of current pesticide use (like Zenevex E4). It's more of a NIMBY site than anything that proposes a bonafide, effective alternative to reduce disease vectors.

Quite amusing.


2 people like this
Posted by Oscar
a resident of another community
on Aug 1, 2015 at 6:29 pm

I do see some information from "Healthy Alternatives..." in one post above. Maybe the representatives from Vector Control posting anonymously could at least tell us how Zenevex E4 works, what exactly is in it (all of the ingredients - not just the 4% said to be "active") and what creatures it does harm. ARE BEES KILLED IN THEIR HIVES? DO YOU RECOMMEND THAT PEOPLE AND PETS STAY INDOORS? DO YOU THROW LATE-NIGHT PARTIES IN THE FOGGED AREA AS PROOF THAT HUMANS ARE NOT AFFECTED? ARE YOU HUMANS?


Like this comment
Posted by Spray tonight
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Aug 2, 2015 at 3:47 pm

Spraying begins tonight?


Like this comment
Posted by Barbara Wood
Almanac staff writer
on Aug 2, 2015 at 5:10 pm

Barbara Wood is a registered user.

Yes, see this story:
Web Link


2 people like this
Posted by Enuff
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Aug 3, 2015 at 4:46 pm

In spite of its exotic, fear-inducing name, the West Nile virus is far milder than many flu viruses. Most people never have any symptoms, and only 1% of those who develop symptoms get seriously ill. There have been only 2 deaths from West Nile Virus in Northern California this year, and those who succumbed were elderly and frail. "Your health is put at a much higher risk of harm from mosquito fogging than it is from West Nile Virus."
See: Web Link and Web Link

Regarding the recent mosquito fogging/spraying in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, the chemical used, etofenprox (the chemical in Xenivex), is a neurotoxin that is also carcinogenic and lingers for months: "In 60 days there is still 25% left… and even at 210 days there is still 3% present on the soil."

Thankfully, there is a pending lawsuit in Santa Clara County to stop this outrageous "fogging" that is already killing bees and covering people’s properties with an invisible layer of long-lasting poisonous chemical dust. It would seem the big scare over West Nile Virus has more to do with the pesticide company finding markets for its products, and our counties’ over-zealous Vector agencies.


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