News

Menlo Park: Mother, daughter jailed after raucous traffic stop on Willow Road

 

Following a raucous incident during a traffic stop in the 500 block of Willow Road on Saturday night, Feb. 27, two women -- a mother from Menlo Park and her daughter from East Palo Alto -- were booked into San Mateo County jail on charges associated with resisting arrest.

Keilli Maxey, 24, of East Palo Alto is in jail on a no-bail status and charged with obstructing or resisting an officer and making terrorist threats, according to the Menlo Park Police Department.

Ms. Maxey's mother, Lisa Marie MaxeyStribling of Menlo Park, 50, was booked and charged with obstructing or resisting an officer as well as battery on a police officer, police said.

The incident began after an officer pulled over a vehicle determined to be speeding and lacking a license plate, police said. The officer determined that the driver, Ms. Maxey, had an outstanding arrest warrant against her from the Livermore Police Department on charges of assault with a deadly weapon.

Ms. Maxey allegedly pulled away while being handcuffed and attempted to kick officers, police said. Once handcuffed and in the rear of a patrol car, she allegedly screamed, threatened to "kill" an officer and tried, unsuccessfully, to kick out the side-rear windows of the car with both feet, police said.

Ms. Maxey also allegedly spat on an officer, leaving visible saliva stains on the officer's uniform.

Ms. MaxeyStribling, who police say also resisted arrest, allegedly punched an officer on the back with a closed fist, "causing a complaint of pain" from the officer, police said.

Dave Boyce

Comments

18 people like this
Posted by Thankful
a resident of Menlo Park: Sharon Heights
on Mar 1, 2016 at 4:19 pm

Thanks to our friends in blue for handling this difficult situation with professionalism and restraint. It can't be easy... thank you for your service!


16 people like this
Posted by Menlo Voter.
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Mar 1, 2016 at 5:49 pm

Menlo Voter. is a registered user.

I'm sure the police were just "picking on" these two for "no reason." NOT

Remember this the next time you want to condemn the police for how they do they're job. This is the kind of crap they have to deal with day in and day out.


28 people like this
Posted by Cops Lives Matter
a resident of Menlo Park: Sharon Heights
on Mar 3, 2016 at 9:32 am

Police Officers are just doing their job. If you are courteous to them they will return the respect in kind. No one likes being stopped because it usually means a traffic ticket and traffic school. But those are the breaks. Just sign the ticket and be on your way. There is no reason to be rude or belligerent over something that is most likely your fault. If you disagree with the reason the officer pulled you over for, then challenge it in court.

Remember that it is just as stressful for the police officer as it is for you. Police officers, in some instances, are assaulted or even murdered over routine traffic stops. So if you get stopped try to remember that the officer is willing to put his/her life in harm's way so that we can live in a safe society.


5 people like this
Posted by Big Hutch
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Mar 3, 2016 at 9:55 am

CLM - Yup. Always the uppity citizens that are causing problems. Never, ever a member of law enforcement.

Probably the case here, based on the excellent Almanac reporting above; the Almanac never fails.

But just for grins, let's wait to see the court case, and for the body-cam video to be released.


4 people like this
Posted by Menlo Voter.
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Mar 3, 2016 at 11:26 am

Menlo Voter. is a registered user.

Big Hutch:

that's not what CLM said, but you know that. Of course, there are occasions when it is the officer's fault, but those are rare.

given that one of the women had an arrest warrant, my experience tells me she resisted arrest.


2 people like this
Posted by Peter
a resident of Menlo Park: Belle Haven
on Mar 3, 2016 at 11:28 am

Shall we wait for actual account informtion via a plea or court evidence? Or judge off newsweakly reporting?

Body cameras? Ha... funny.


18 people like this
Posted by POGO
a resident of Woodside: other
on Mar 3, 2016 at 11:30 am

Big Hutch -

Yes, there are bad apples in every profession but there are two facts in this incident that are difficult to dispute.

Before slamming the police with innuendo, perhaps you should read the article.

First, the vehicle didn't have a license plate. I would think that's a pretty good reason to stop any car. And after running her driver's license through their system, they found the driver had an outstanding arrest warrant for assault with a deadly weapon. That's why she was being arrested.

As far as I'm concerned, I'm glad she's in jail and the police were able to go home to their families that evening.

The police stand between law abiding citizens and people who would do you harm. A simple thank you might be appropriate.


12 people like this
Posted by Joe
a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Mar 3, 2016 at 11:42 am

CLM's notion that police officers will respond with courtesy when courtesy is shown them doesn't hold water. I've experienced perfect courtesy from officers on many occasions, but there were memorable times -- not just when I was involved but others whose retelling I would consider accurate -- when the officer unloaded the baggage of his stressful day. Outrageous, in a word.

What really irks me is that the public is expected to forgive these outbursts, that police officers deserve the benefit of the doubt and respect from the public no matter how incapably they may exhibit the results of their training. They're all heroes. No, they're not.

It is incumbent upon officers to infuse themselves with deep respect for the people for whom they work. And they should be reminded of this obligation every single day by their superiors. It's a hard job, but one with excellent pay and benefits. It's a job that merits significant and repeated attention to this particular issue.


6 people like this
Posted by Menlo Voter.
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Mar 3, 2016 at 4:29 pm

Menlo Voter. is a registered user.

"It is incumbent upon officers to infuse themselves with deep respect for the people for whom they work."

And it is incumbent upon the public infuse themselves with deep respect to those willing to put THEIR lives on the line to protect the public. The need for respect runs both ways. Remember that the next time an officer stops you for something and you feel it necessary to remind him or her that "I pay your salary." (I wish I had a dollar for every time some self entitled jerk said that). Remember that the next time you hear a prowler in your yard or someone breaking into your home and you call the police. They'll show up and do their job whether or not you're a self entitled jerk.

I can tell you from experience the police get very little respect and the more affluent the community the less respect the officers get.


3 people like this
Posted by Joe
a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Mar 3, 2016 at 4:53 pm

Who among us is not responsible for handling their own stresses? Who among us are legally armed and invested with immense authority, thereby incurring a much higher obligation to manage that stress? Who should be receiving whatever psychological help and additional training they need to actually and routinely do that?

I don't mouth off to officers, nor do I have much occasion to interact with them. I'm a careful driver and grateful that the men and women in blue are just a phone call away. But I am also an observer and on the occasions when we do encounter each other, I expect to be treated with respect FROM THE GET GO. I don't buy for a minute the idea that I should give expressions of contempt for the public a pass.

The need for a genuine revolution in the way police handle themselves and think about the public -- this particular case aside as it was apparently appropriately handled -- is blindingly obvious.


7 people like this
Posted by View
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Mar 3, 2016 at 5:41 pm

Retire at 100k for life? And medical? And carry a gun?

No, you don't get to have a bad day - call in sick. Stay home if the gf dropped you.

And keep your body camera charged and ON.


Like this comment
Posted by Menlo Voter.
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Mar 3, 2016 at 6:07 pm

Menlo Voter. is a registered user.

view:

you don't have clue


4 people like this
Posted by Menlo Voter.
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Mar 3, 2016 at 6:23 pm

Menlo Voter. is a registered user.

Joe:

I never said officers are not responsible for handling their own stress. EVERYONE is, including the public. The officer that stops you is not your punching bag. Yet, you'd be surprised how many people seem to think it's ok to abuse officers because the officers are expected to maintain their composure. And in 99.99% of cases they do. If they don't that is a problem and should be dealt with. But, everyone makes it sound like this is regularly occurrence. It's not.

I can't think of a time when I have been stopped that I wasn't treated with anything but respect by the officer that stopped me, FROM THE GET GO. I've been stopped all over the bay area by the CHP and City Police agencies (I drive 35,000 miles a year). Generally, in my experience, if you aren't receiving said respect, it's because you're acting like an ASS.

"The need for a genuine revolution in the way police handle themselves and think about the public -- this particular case aside as it was apparently appropriately handled -- is blindingly obvious." Gee thanks. The way the police handle the public is not the problem. The problem is the lack of respect of the public towards the Police in how they do their job. Don't believe me? I suggest you sign up for a ride along with your local department and see what your officers deal with day in and day out and how they handle the public. You'll be informed. Second hand stories from your friends that are obviously biased are not a true picture. Think maybe they're going to paint themselves in a positive light?


Like this comment
Posted by whatever
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Mar 4, 2016 at 10:58 am

"making terrorist threats"
Actually in Calif it's now classified as a "criminal threat" and the recipient of the threat must thereby be "placed in a state of reasonably sustained fear for his/her safety." California Penal Code 422 PC


8 people like this
Posted by Shoeter
a resident of another community
on Mar 4, 2016 at 6:11 pm

For over 30 years, I have been acquainted with the men and women of the Menlo Park PD. Did you know that MPPD has some of the highest required qualifications in the state to be hired? Even in the 70s, officers had degrees from Saint Patricks Seminary and 4 year universities. SGTs almost all have a minimum of 4 year degrees.

This agency has some of the most well trained, equipped and prepared police professionals in the trade, and I have personally witnessed COUNTLESS incidents such as the one reported here that were handled calmly and in policy. I now live far away from my home-town of Menlo Park and only rarely do I see the initiative. work ethic and sound policing here like I did and still do in MP when I come home to visit.

Keep up the good work, come home safely to your families, and stay off YouTube!


3 people like this
Posted by Mike Keenly
a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Mar 4, 2016 at 9:46 pm

A driver with an outstanding warrant, speeding in a vehicle without license plates? Might as well put a huge sign on your car that says "Arrest me!"


1 person likes this
Posted by Both sides right
a resident of another community
on Mar 4, 2016 at 10:58 pm

I find myself agreeing with Cops Lives Matter, Menlo Voter AND Big Hutch.

From what is alleged, it doesn't sound like this is a good example of an innocent citizen getting harassed. Of course, that should be subject to a full review of the evidence in court.

I don't expect cops to behave any better or any worse than the public at large. They're human beings coming from the general population. Some are saints, some are average, and some have anger/authority abuse issues. I'm not going to assume a cop misbehaved just because of an allegation, nor am I going to assume he or she didn't because it's only natural that the citizen on the other side is going to be upset over being "caught."

The problem as I see it is a culture that has been developed with the active assistance of unions, particularly in California, that when there is a problem, to protect the cop at all costs. Lack of public scrutiny, secret complaint files that get destroyed, etc. etc.

To be fair, other public sector jobs like teachers have the same underlying problem. I think we can all agree that a bad cop has much more potential to do harm, and it looks like American society is coming to grips with these issues more and more lately. Things will change, but slowly.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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