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Menlo Park: Redevelopment plans for Beltramo's Wines & Spirits approved

 
A rendering of the proposed residential building, with 27 rental apartments, at the former Beltramo's Wines & Spirits site at 1540 El Camino Real. Five are intended to be dedicated for rental by low-income tenants. (Image courtesy KSH Architects/City of Menlo Park.)

The Menlo Park Planning Commission voted 6-0 on Monday, Feb. 26, with Commissioner Susan Goodhue absent, to approve plans to construct two new buildings to replace the former Beltramo's Wines & Spirits site at 1540 El Camino Real.

The proposed development, by developer Derek Hunter, will add 27 rental apartments in one 35-foot-tall, three-story building, adding up to about 35,000 square feet, with two levels of underground parking; and a two-story, 32-foot-tall, 41,000-square-foot office building at the site.

The plans, which fall within the city's El Camino Real/downtown specific plan, were approved on the condition that certain architectural changes be made, at the request of Commissioner Henry Riggs, to use original-color terra cotta on the office building and add other variations to the design.

Commissioners asked why the applicant did not opt to build at the maximum allowed density, which would require some negotiation with the city as to which "community benefits" would have to be provided. Mr. Hunter said it was a group decision to stick to the more straightforward guidelines associated with the lower level of development.

The developer proposes to add 19 surface parking spaces and 163 parking spaces in the underground parking garage. Bike racks, a pedestrian path through the middle of the site and the requisite amount of open space would also be provided.

The developer also proposes to remove 41 trees, eight of which are considered heritage trees, replace the heritage trees at a two-to-one ratio, and plant some additional trees.

On the below-market-rate housing front, Mr. Hunter has proposed to provide five low-income housing units on site and pay $135,345 in additional below-market-rate housing fees to meet the city's required contribution.

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Comments

7 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Feb 27, 2018 at 12:24 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"Mr. Hunter said it was a group decision to stick to the more straightforward guidelines associated with the lower level of development."

Very smart decision.


6 people like this
Posted by MP resident
a resident of Menlo Park: Felton Gables
on Feb 27, 2018 at 1:25 pm

Glad to see that the plan is attractive and that it complies with the town's specific plan. All positive.


6 people like this
Posted by Larry Rockwell
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on Feb 27, 2018 at 2:15 pm

Looking more like Sunnyvale every day. And this is supposed to reflect "improvements" suggested by the architectural review board? Boring.


Like this comment
Posted by Joan
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Feb 28, 2018 at 12:25 pm

What an ugly building. I agree, MP looks more like Sunnyvale every day. Sad.



10 people like this
Posted by MPer
a resident of Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Feb 28, 2018 at 1:55 pm

what is truly SAD are the commenters that feel pour current dilapidated mid century ugly ECR and downtown is fine, while poo pooing every new proposal as ugly. Sunnyvale is laughing at us. This building looks nice and will work for it's use. Sorry, not every building can be designed by Frank Gehry and if they were, they'd be even more expensive to build. Get a clue and stop being so opposed to EVERYTHING.


10 people like this
Posted by Fernando B.
a resident of Menlo Park: Belle Haven
on Feb 28, 2018 at 2:26 pm

Two points:

1) This looks better than Sunnyvale architecture
2) Sunnyvale architecture is totally fine!

Somebody call the "waaaambulance" for Larry Rockwell and Joan, though. We're sorry your lives are so tough!


Like this comment
Posted by Hank Lawrence
a resident of Menlo Park: Sharon Heights
on Mar 1, 2018 at 11:06 pm

The Stanford ECR projects look much nicer. This is a rather sterile design.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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