News

Menlo Park woman loses $25K in phone scam

A Menlo Park woman was apparently the victim of a phone scam when she mailed $25,000 to an address in New York because she was told it was needed to bail her son out of a Mexican jail, according to the Menlo Park police.

The 74-year-old victim reportedly received a call from a person she thought was her son, and later from someone who identified himself as her son's friend, asking for the money around Aug. 1.

On Aug. 8, the woman received a call from her son saying that he was safe and hadn't been in Mexico, said police spokeswoman Nicole Acker.

The woman told police she doesn't remember the New York address she sent the money to, police said.

The police have alerted stores that sell gift cards and cash cards to be on the lookout for elderly people buying large amounts of the cards that are frequently used to pay off scammers, Acker said.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Almanac Online for as little as $5/month.

Learn more

The incident appears to be a variation on what is known as the "grandparent scam," which, according to the Federal Trade Commission, victimized nearly one in five people contacted by scammers nationwide in 2017, resulting in cumulative losses of $328 million, the AARP reported.

-

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews and Facebook for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Menlo Park woman loses $25K in phone scam

by / Almanac

Uploaded: Wed, Aug 14, 2019, 11:53 am

A Menlo Park woman was apparently the victim of a phone scam when she mailed $25,000 to an address in New York because she was told it was needed to bail her son out of a Mexican jail, according to the Menlo Park police.

The 74-year-old victim reportedly received a call from a person she thought was her son, and later from someone who identified himself as her son's friend, asking for the money around Aug. 1.

On Aug. 8, the woman received a call from her son saying that he was safe and hadn't been in Mexico, said police spokeswoman Nicole Acker.

The woman told police she doesn't remember the New York address she sent the money to, police said.

The police have alerted stores that sell gift cards and cash cards to be on the lookout for elderly people buying large amounts of the cards that are frequently used to pay off scammers, Acker said.

The incident appears to be a variation on what is known as the "grandparent scam," which, according to the Federal Trade Commission, victimized nearly one in five people contacted by scammers nationwide in 2017, resulting in cumulative losses of $328 million, the AARP reported.

-

Comments

Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.