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Gov. Newsom orders immediate end to indoor dining, other activities due to statewide surge in coronavirus

The state has ordered all 53 counties to close indoor activities at businesses that include restaurants and bars, movie theaters, museums and card rooms. Courtesy Tim Mossholder, Unsplash

Indoor activities across California must be reined in as the state combats a resurgence of the COVID-19 coronavirus, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday.

The state ordered all 53 counties to close indoor activities at restaurants, wineries, movie theaters, zoos, museums, card rooms and all bars.

The new order will have a stark impact on San Mateo County, which on June 17 reopened most businesses that Newsom said must now shut down. Santa Clara County did not initially appear to be as dramatically affected by the updated order, since it has not permitted indoor operations of most businesses.

Each county on the state's coronavirus monitoring list -- which now includes Santa Clara County, according to a press release sent out at 4:30 p.m. Monday -- must also close gyms, places of worship, offices in non-critical sectors, hair and nail salons and indoor malls in addition to the statewide closure. Today was the first day those businesses had been allowed to reopen.

"The state confirmed this afternoon that it will require sectors closed for indoor operations in counties on the monitoring list to close in Santa Clara County effective Wednesday, July 15, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. We wanted to share this information with businesses and residents as soon as possible," the county Public Health Department said in the email.

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The 30-plus counties on the monitoring list make up roughly 80 percent of the state's population, according to Newsom.

"We're seeing an increase in the spread of the virus, so that's why it's incumbent upon all of us to recognize, soberly, that COVID-19 is not going away anytime soon until there is a vaccine or an effective therapy," Newsom said.

The governor has often compared the state's ever-evolving coronavirus response to a dimmer switch, with the state opening and closing sectors of the economy as the virus' spread ebbs and flows.

Newsom said Monday's restrictions on indoor activities were driven in part by an influx of coronavirus patients in intensive care units in the state's rural areas like Lake, Butte and Placer counties.

State health officials have also observed a shortage of ventilators in areas like Imperial County. Newsom said the state has some 10,000 ventilators available, but such shortages are still concerning.

Coronavirus hospitalizations have risen by about 28% over the last two weeks, from 5,077 on June 29 to 6,485 as of Sunday. In the last week, the state's seven-day average of positive coronavirus tests rose from 7,876 on July 6 to 8,211 on Monday.

The state's positivity rate has also continued trending north of 7% even as the number of tests across the state has surpassed 100,000

per day.

While the virus reasserts itself, Newsom expressed confidence in the state's ability to tame it as it did in May, provided that residents continue following health and safety guidelines by wearing face coverings and maintaining their physical distance from others.

"We were able to suppress the spread of this virus, we were going to knock down the growth of this in the beginning," Newsom said. "We're going to do that again -- there's no doubt in my mind."

Lloyd Lee contributed to this report.

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Gov. Newsom orders immediate end to indoor dining, other activities due to statewide surge in coronavirus

Uploaded: Mon, Jul 13, 2020, 4:33 pm
Updated: Mon, Jul 13, 2020, 5:02 pm

Indoor activities across California must be reined in as the state combats a resurgence of the COVID-19 coronavirus, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday.

The state ordered all 53 counties to close indoor activities at restaurants, wineries, movie theaters, zoos, museums, card rooms and all bars.

The new order will have a stark impact on San Mateo County, which on June 17 reopened most businesses that Newsom said must now shut down. Santa Clara County did not initially appear to be as dramatically affected by the updated order, since it has not permitted indoor operations of most businesses.

Each county on the state's coronavirus monitoring list -- which now includes Santa Clara County, according to a press release sent out at 4:30 p.m. Monday -- must also close gyms, places of worship, offices in non-critical sectors, hair and nail salons and indoor malls in addition to the statewide closure. Today was the first day those businesses had been allowed to reopen.

"The state confirmed this afternoon that it will require sectors closed for indoor operations in counties on the monitoring list to close in Santa Clara County effective Wednesday, July 15, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. We wanted to share this information with businesses and residents as soon as possible," the county Public Health Department said in the email.

The 30-plus counties on the monitoring list make up roughly 80 percent of the state's population, according to Newsom.

"We're seeing an increase in the spread of the virus, so that's why it's incumbent upon all of us to recognize, soberly, that COVID-19 is not going away anytime soon until there is a vaccine or an effective therapy," Newsom said.

The governor has often compared the state's ever-evolving coronavirus response to a dimmer switch, with the state opening and closing sectors of the economy as the virus' spread ebbs and flows.

Newsom said Monday's restrictions on indoor activities were driven in part by an influx of coronavirus patients in intensive care units in the state's rural areas like Lake, Butte and Placer counties.

State health officials have also observed a shortage of ventilators in areas like Imperial County. Newsom said the state has some 10,000 ventilators available, but such shortages are still concerning.

Coronavirus hospitalizations have risen by about 28% over the last two weeks, from 5,077 on June 29 to 6,485 as of Sunday. In the last week, the state's seven-day average of positive coronavirus tests rose from 7,876 on July 6 to 8,211 on Monday.

The state's positivity rate has also continued trending north of 7% even as the number of tests across the state has surpassed 100,000

per day.

While the virus reasserts itself, Newsom expressed confidence in the state's ability to tame it as it did in May, provided that residents continue following health and safety guidelines by wearing face coverings and maintaining their physical distance from others.

"We were able to suppress the spread of this virus, we were going to knock down the growth of this in the beginning," Newsom said. "We're going to do that again -- there's no doubt in my mind."

Lloyd Lee contributed to this report.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

resident
Menlo Park: other
on Jul 13, 2020 at 4:42 pm
resident, Menlo Park: other
on Jul 13, 2020 at 4:42 pm
7 people like this

Really reckless for San Mateo County to push to reopen these businesses, especially places like bars, gyms, and churches where people are close together without masks for extended periods of time. I blame the state government too for letting them get away with it. California averaged 100 COVID deaths per day last week, which is really tragic.


another resident
Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jul 13, 2020 at 5:30 pm
another resident , Menlo Park: The Willows
on Jul 13, 2020 at 5:30 pm
5 people like this

I am glad the governor made this hard decision. It's hard for people, myself included, not to join friends and family for activities we enjoy. If it's allowed by the state, it's extremely hard for individuals to choose not to participate. Asking people to resist social activities that are allowed by the government is asking too much of individuals. It's hard for the government to create these restrictions, and there will certainly be people and groups who protest the restrictions, but it's the burden of our elected officials to create restrictions that are in our collective best interest.


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