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Newsom: Schools in watch-list counties cannot reopen in person

State announces new mask requirements, criteria for closing campuses in case of infections

An empty classroom at Menlo-Atherton High School on March 16, 2020. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced on Friday that public and private schools in counties on the state's coronavirus watch list cannot reopen for in-person instruction until they've been off the list for 14 days.

This means that schools in these counties must plan for full distance learning in the fall, and those that had hoped to reopen their campuses, including Palo Alto Unified, must switch gears. Counties on the watch list have not met the state's benchmarks for reopening, including positive case rates, hospitalizations and capacity.

Counties not being monitored by the state can decide locally in partnership with local health leaders whether to offer in-person instruction, Newsom said.

San Mateo County Health Chief Louise Rogers said Friday that the county is not currently on the state's watch list but "likely" will be soon, given the county's case rate of 101.2 cases per 100,000 in the population (a 14-day rolling average).

Palo Alto Unified Superintendent Don Austin sent a letter to staff and families on Friday afternoon confirming that the district will not reopen its elementary schools in August as planned but instead will move to full distance learning for all students.

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In a press conference, Newsom cited the rise in coronavirus cases statewide as a driving force for the new mandate for reopening schools. As of July 16, California has just over 366,000 confirmed cases, with 9,986 new confirmed cases Thursday. Of California's 58 counties, 32 are on the watch list.

"We all prefer in-classroom instruction for all the obvious reasons … but only, only if it can be done safely," Newsom said. "Safety is foundational and safety will ultimately make the determination of how we go about educating our kids."

District superintendents can, however, in consultation with labor unions, parents and community organizations, seek a waiver from their local health officers to allow elementary schools to reopen for in-person instruction, the state said. Health officers must consider local data and consult with the California Department of Public Health when reviewing the waiver requests.

Newsom also announced new criteria to prevent the spread of the coronavirus for schools that are allowed to reopen. Masks will be required for all staff and students in third grade and above (unless they're exempt), and they will be "strongly encouraged" for younger students. Schools should provide masks to students who don't have them and must "exclude" students who refuse to wear masks, the state's new guidance reads.

Staff will be required to keep 6 feet of distance between themselves and their students, while students should maintain 6 feet from one another "as practicable." The school day should start with temperature and symptom checks, Newsom said. The state also will require regular testing of all teachers and staff: 25% of staff should be tested every two weeks, or 50% every month, to rotate testing of all staff over time.

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Newsom emphasized the importance of the health and safety of teachers and staff.

"We're not just talking about our children. We're also talking about those we entrust our children with when we drop them off at school as well and their health and safety. It's an ecosystem, our public education system. We are responsible to address the needs of that ecosystem," he said.

If a school or school district resumes in-person instruction, but its county is later placed on the monitoring list, schools should begin testing staff or increase the frequency of testing. They are not, however, required to close, according to the California Department of Public Health.

Acknowledging that distance learning failed to meet the needs of many students in the spring, Newsom said the state expects schools to offer "rigorous" distance learning this fall. Beyond requiring daily, live interaction between teachers and students; providing devices and "challenging assignments equivalent to in-person classes," Newsom didn't provide further detail on how the state defines "rigorous."

He noted that the state has invested $5.3 billion to help schools address learning loss and technology needs, as well as to purchase additional personal protective equipment.

"We want to do our best to create some sense of equivalency with the obvious constraints that is distance learning," he said.

Newsom also outlined criteria for closing schools in the event of confirmed cases among students or staff. Schools should first consult with their local public health officer, Newsom said. A classroom cohort should be sent home if there is a confirmed case, and other exposed students and staff should be quarantined for 14 days. An entire school should close when multiple cohorts have cases or more than 5% of a school tests positive for the coronavirus.

A school district must shutter if 25% of their schools have closed within a 14-day period, after which time school districts may reopen with the approval of the local public health officer.

The state will soon release guidelines for reopening universities and community colleges, Newsom said.

The state's new guidance for reopening schools is available here.

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

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Newsom: Schools in watch-list counties cannot reopen in person

State announces new mask requirements, criteria for closing campuses in case of infections

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Jul 17, 2020, 2:44 pm

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced on Friday that public and private schools in counties on the state's coronavirus watch list cannot reopen for in-person instruction until they've been off the list for 14 days.

This means that schools in these counties must plan for full distance learning in the fall, and those that had hoped to reopen their campuses, including Palo Alto Unified, must switch gears. Counties on the watch list have not met the state's benchmarks for reopening, including positive case rates, hospitalizations and capacity.

Counties not being monitored by the state can decide locally in partnership with local health leaders whether to offer in-person instruction, Newsom said.

San Mateo County Health Chief Louise Rogers said Friday that the county is not currently on the state's watch list but "likely" will be soon, given the county's case rate of 101.2 cases per 100,000 in the population (a 14-day rolling average).

Palo Alto Unified Superintendent Don Austin sent a letter to staff and families on Friday afternoon confirming that the district will not reopen its elementary schools in August as planned but instead will move to full distance learning for all students.

In a press conference, Newsom cited the rise in coronavirus cases statewide as a driving force for the new mandate for reopening schools. As of July 16, California has just over 366,000 confirmed cases, with 9,986 new confirmed cases Thursday. Of California's 58 counties, 32 are on the watch list.

"We all prefer in-classroom instruction for all the obvious reasons … but only, only if it can be done safely," Newsom said. "Safety is foundational and safety will ultimately make the determination of how we go about educating our kids."

District superintendents can, however, in consultation with labor unions, parents and community organizations, seek a waiver from their local health officers to allow elementary schools to reopen for in-person instruction, the state said. Health officers must consider local data and consult with the California Department of Public Health when reviewing the waiver requests.

Newsom also announced new criteria to prevent the spread of the coronavirus for schools that are allowed to reopen. Masks will be required for all staff and students in third grade and above (unless they're exempt), and they will be "strongly encouraged" for younger students. Schools should provide masks to students who don't have them and must "exclude" students who refuse to wear masks, the state's new guidance reads.

Staff will be required to keep 6 feet of distance between themselves and their students, while students should maintain 6 feet from one another "as practicable." The school day should start with temperature and symptom checks, Newsom said. The state also will require regular testing of all teachers and staff: 25% of staff should be tested every two weeks, or 50% every month, to rotate testing of all staff over time.

Newsom emphasized the importance of the health and safety of teachers and staff.

"We're not just talking about our children. We're also talking about those we entrust our children with when we drop them off at school as well and their health and safety. It's an ecosystem, our public education system. We are responsible to address the needs of that ecosystem," he said.

If a school or school district resumes in-person instruction, but its county is later placed on the monitoring list, schools should begin testing staff or increase the frequency of testing. They are not, however, required to close, according to the California Department of Public Health.

Acknowledging that distance learning failed to meet the needs of many students in the spring, Newsom said the state expects schools to offer "rigorous" distance learning this fall. Beyond requiring daily, live interaction between teachers and students; providing devices and "challenging assignments equivalent to in-person classes," Newsom didn't provide further detail on how the state defines "rigorous."

He noted that the state has invested $5.3 billion to help schools address learning loss and technology needs, as well as to purchase additional personal protective equipment.

"We want to do our best to create some sense of equivalency with the obvious constraints that is distance learning," he said.

Newsom also outlined criteria for closing schools in the event of confirmed cases among students or staff. Schools should first consult with their local public health officer, Newsom said. A classroom cohort should be sent home if there is a confirmed case, and other exposed students and staff should be quarantined for 14 days. An entire school should close when multiple cohorts have cases or more than 5% of a school tests positive for the coronavirus.

A school district must shutter if 25% of their schools have closed within a 14-day period, after which time school districts may reopen with the approval of the local public health officer.

The state will soon release guidelines for reopening universities and community colleges, Newsom said.

The state's new guidance for reopening schools is available here.

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

Comments

Jake
another community
on Jul 19, 2020 at 1:20 pm
Jake, another community
on Jul 19, 2020 at 1:20 pm
Like this comment

Too bad if San Mateo County makes the list. I was thinking Menlo Park could be the coronavirus test lab for herding school children together in schools and then back home 5 times a week. Maybe we can use the little town of Atwater (Merced County) for the deadly experiment. A couple of months ago, the City Council there declared their town would re-open with no masks. Among the businesses demanding re-opening were several local "pastors." Check out the meeting tape online.


Marina Kalugina
Menlo Park: other
on Jul 20, 2020 at 1:11 pm
Marina Kalugina, Menlo Park: other
on Jul 20, 2020 at 1:11 pm
3 people like this

By the time Newsom comes to his senses most families will be more happy with homeschooling then what goes on in public schools. RECALL Newsom....


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