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Coronavirus delays start of high school sports seasons

Central Coast Section plans to release regular season schedule on Tuesday

Woodside High School assistant varsity football coach Danny Bowers makes sure football players stand 6 feet apart and squat correctly on the high school's football field in Woodside on June 24. On July 20, the California California Interscholastic Federation released dates for the final days of section playoffs and regional/state championships during the 2020-21 year. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Local high school sports teams won't be competing until at least December or January, the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) announced Monday.

"We are continuously monitoring the directives and guidelines released from the Governor's Office, the California Department of Education, the California Department of Public Health, and local county health departments and agencies as these directives and guidelines are followed by our member schools/school districts with student health and safety at the forefront," the governing body for high school sports in California said in a press release.

The California Interscholastic Federation released a modified season that pushes section playoffs for several sports, including football, water polo, basketball and baseball, into spring and summer of 2021.

Given the changes, the CIF will temporarily allow student athletes to participate on outside teams at the same time as their high school teams.

The CIF's announcement leaves it up to each section to set their regular-season schedules for multiple sports. Midpeninsula student-athletes and their families can expect to see their schedules on Tuesday, when the Central Coast Section's Executive Committee will vote and release its plan, Commissioner David Grissom said. The section administers sports from San Francisco to King City.

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The committee faces numerous decisions, including whether it should forego regional tournaments, said Grissom, who expects the 10-member group to set schedules that will largely fall in line with the CIF's sports calendar.

"What the state put out basically was a reduction of seasons from three to two," Grissom said. While the state's schedule allows for full seasons of competition, a student who plays in two sports will see their seasons compete with one another.

"Student-athletes are going to have to make choices where they didn't have to make decisions (in the past)," Grissom said.

The changes are in effect for the 2020-21 school year only. If public health and education guidelines change, however, local high schools can allow for athletic activity to potentially resume, CIF said.

Grissom plans to suggest switching gymnastics from the fall, its current category under the CIF schedule, to the spring in the CCS based on feedback from people in the sport and public health orders preventing student-athletes from practicing at gyms. Also, the Central Coast and San Diego sections are the only ones across the state that offer gymnastics, which doesn't have a state tournament.

Another question facing the CCS Executive Committee is whether to extend the end of the summer season, which allows student-athletes to participate in conditioning training, from this Friday, July 24, to December.

Steven Kryger, Menlo-Atherton High School's athletic director, said that despite the pushback of sports seasons, the schools' conditioning training, which began June 16, will continue. "We are going to allow our athletes to do conditioning practices, and whatever the county health officer allows, through the fall," he said.  

Once the CCS releases regular season schedules, schools will need to scramble to complete their sports schedules for the year, Grissom said. They also face pressure over which teams will be able to use a facility at a given time.

"No matter how you slice the pie, when you have two seasons and one stadium, then you've got competing interests to get on the playing field," he said.

Read the full CIF statement here:

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

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Coronavirus delays start of high school sports seasons

Central Coast Section plans to release regular season schedule on Tuesday

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 2:59 pm

Local high school sports teams won't be competing until at least December or January, the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) announced Monday.

"We are continuously monitoring the directives and guidelines released from the Governor's Office, the California Department of Education, the California Department of Public Health, and local county health departments and agencies as these directives and guidelines are followed by our member schools/school districts with student health and safety at the forefront," the governing body for high school sports in California said in a press release.

The California Interscholastic Federation released a modified season that pushes section playoffs for several sports, including football, water polo, basketball and baseball, into spring and summer of 2021.

Given the changes, the CIF will temporarily allow student athletes to participate on outside teams at the same time as their high school teams.

The CIF's announcement leaves it up to each section to set their regular-season schedules for multiple sports. Midpeninsula student-athletes and their families can expect to see their schedules on Tuesday, when the Central Coast Section's Executive Committee will vote and release its plan, Commissioner David Grissom said. The section administers sports from San Francisco to King City.

The committee faces numerous decisions, including whether it should forego regional tournaments, said Grissom, who expects the 10-member group to set schedules that will largely fall in line with the CIF's sports calendar.

"What the state put out basically was a reduction of seasons from three to two," Grissom said. While the state's schedule allows for full seasons of competition, a student who plays in two sports will see their seasons compete with one another.

"Student-athletes are going to have to make choices where they didn't have to make decisions (in the past)," Grissom said.

The changes are in effect for the 2020-21 school year only. If public health and education guidelines change, however, local high schools can allow for athletic activity to potentially resume, CIF said.

Grissom plans to suggest switching gymnastics from the fall, its current category under the CIF schedule, to the spring in the CCS based on feedback from people in the sport and public health orders preventing student-athletes from practicing at gyms. Also, the Central Coast and San Diego sections are the only ones across the state that offer gymnastics, which doesn't have a state tournament.

Another question facing the CCS Executive Committee is whether to extend the end of the summer season, which allows student-athletes to participate in conditioning training, from this Friday, July 24, to December.

Steven Kryger, Menlo-Atherton High School's athletic director, said that despite the pushback of sports seasons, the schools' conditioning training, which began June 16, will continue. "We are going to allow our athletes to do conditioning practices, and whatever the county health officer allows, through the fall," he said.  

Once the CCS releases regular season schedules, schools will need to scramble to complete their sports schedules for the year, Grissom said. They also face pressure over which teams will be able to use a facility at a given time.

"No matter how you slice the pie, when you have two seasons and one stadium, then you've got competing interests to get on the playing field," he said.

Read the full CIF statement here:

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

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