Arts

'Ugly Nature' talk highlights natural beauty in humble places

No way this fruit bat could be called ugly, but this little guy mostly comes out at night, which is not when we expect the best from nature, as Charles Hood discusses in his talk "Ugly Nature." Shown is a fruit bat from the Palo Alto Junior Museum and Zoo in an undated photo. Embarcadero Media file photo by Nicholas Wright.

For most, the idea of "spending time in nature" probably wouldn't immediately conjure up thoughts of exploring a vacant lot or examining bugs and weeds, let alone enjoying such quality time after dark. But even among the humblest flora and fauna, nature offers moments of beauty and fascination, according to poet and naturalist Charles Hood. He will share how to seek out those moments in an online discussion Sept. 3, 7 p.m., as part of Woodside Arts & Culture's First Friday talks.

And Hood should know: he has studied the natural environments in such varied regions as the South Pole, Tibet and the Amazon, and he has written 16 books and field guides, among them guides to the birds and mammals of California.

His newest book, "A Salad Only the Devil Would Eat: The Joys of Ugly Nature," is a collection of humorous, informative essays that explore how Mother Nature is, frankly, always pretty amazing, no matter what form she takes, from condors to cactus parasites. The book is slated to be published in early November.

For more information, visit woodsideartandculture.org.

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'Ugly Nature' talk highlights natural beauty in humble places

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Sep 3, 2021, 11:55 am

For most, the idea of "spending time in nature" probably wouldn't immediately conjure up thoughts of exploring a vacant lot or examining bugs and weeds, let alone enjoying such quality time after dark. But even among the humblest flora and fauna, nature offers moments of beauty and fascination, according to poet and naturalist Charles Hood. He will share how to seek out those moments in an online discussion Sept. 3, 7 p.m., as part of Woodside Arts & Culture's First Friday talks.

And Hood should know: he has studied the natural environments in such varied regions as the South Pole, Tibet and the Amazon, and he has written 16 books and field guides, among them guides to the birds and mammals of California.

His newest book, "A Salad Only the Devil Would Eat: The Joys of Ugly Nature," is a collection of humorous, informative essays that explore how Mother Nature is, frankly, always pretty amazing, no matter what form she takes, from condors to cactus parasites. The book is slated to be published in early November.

For more information, visit woodsideartandculture.org.

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