News

Laura Parmer-Lohan wants 'bold and swift action' on climate change

Laura Parmer-Lohan, a San Carlos City Council member, has centered on climate change for her campaign. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

With a slogan hinting at her top campaign priority, "Our Environment, Our Future," Laura Parmer-Lohan, former mayor of San Carlos, has established herself in the District 3 Supervisor race as the candidate who wants to take an aggressive stance on climate change initiatives for San Mateo County.

A position that distinguishes her most from the three other candidates is her firm support for the parcel tax measure that will fund preventative measures against wildfires and rising sea levels. (The tax measure will be voted on by residents.)

For Parmer-Lohan, it's a necessity when looking at about half a dozen capital-intensive projects throughout the county that require attention, including an early flood warning system, Belmont Creek restoration and other projects outlined by OneShoreline or the San Mateo County Flood and Seal Level Rise Resiliency District which formed in 2020.

Separate from the projects that could be funded by the tax measure, Parmer-Lohan said that there's a number of issues currently facing the county due to rising sea levels, citing the king tides in Pacifica that are eroding the pier and cliff near the homes on Beach Boulevard and Highway 1 by Surfer's Beach in Half Moon Bay that is only temporarily protected by a riprap.

The opposing candidates point to rising gas prices and inflation as reasons why they can't support another tax measure on county residents at this time. But Parmer-Lohan believes she is addressing her districts' concerns by backing it.

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

"The community has shared with me that they want bold and swift action when it comes to addressing the impacts of climate change," she said.

A mother to two boys, Parmer-Lohan has held several marketing positions in medical device and biotech companies, is currently the chief of staff at Amgen and runs a small business.

She was inspired to get involved in public service after her son, who was 12 at the time and plans to study environmental energy at University of California, Davis, expressed concerns to her about the future and climate change.

Parmer-Lohan first got a taste of city politics by joining San Carlos' single-family housing advisory committee, reviewing design standards for home remodeling or building projects. In 2018, she won a seat on the San Carlos City Council, where she said she is currently working to go beyond the city's Regional Housing Needs Allocation numbers and has helped create a strong climate action plan for the city.

"Now we have one of the most robust climate action plans, with over 40 different strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as to address the impacts of climate change," she said.

Moving to a position on the board of supervisors, where she can increase the scope of the work she has done as a San Carlos City Council, just seemed like the next natural step, she said.

With climate change at the center of her campaign, Parmer-Lohan proposed developing water recycling and reclaiming programs for use in irrigation, farming and landscaping.

Parmer-Lohan said the city of San Carlos has been able to encourage developers to use recycled water in commercial development projects. On a county level, she said a water recycling program will look different depending on the uses, whether that's for development or farming, and that the trick is to make sure that ultimately the costs to carry out these programs will fit people's budgets.

Parmer-Lohan frames the affordable housing crisis as a climate issue and wants to look at housing policies related to the county's ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, support transit-oriented housing, push for more workforce housing and look at available public lands to build upon.

Similar to the apartments that just opened for the Jefferson Union High School District staff, Parmer-Lohan said that she wants to expand local school district partnerships with the county to build more housing.

For housing for farm workers, Parmer-Lohan said she was interested in a plot of land in Half Moon Bay that used to be the site of the former Bay City Flower Company.

"The lack of housing affects all of us whether we know it or not," she said, adding that gaining support for more housing requires listening to everyone's concerns and getting people to agree on the facts as best as possible.

Parmer-Lohan graduated with a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and received her master's degree at the University of California at Berkeley's Haas School of Busines .

She is endorsed by current District 3 Supervisor Don Horsely; Hector Camacho, president of the San Mateo County Board of Education; two trustees of the San Carlos School District; and a long list of other elected officials. She is also endorsed by the Redwood City Firefighters Association, Planned Parenthood and the National Union of Healthcare Workers. Her full list of endorsements can be found on lauraforsupervisor.com.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Lloyd Lee joined The Almanac in 2022 as the Menlo Park reporter. Previously, he was the editorial assistant for the Palo Alto Weekly/PaloAltoOnline.com. Read more >>

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews, Facebook and on Instagram @almanacnews for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Your support is vital to us continuing to bring you city government news. Become a member today.

Laura Parmer-Lohan wants 'bold and swift action' on climate change

by / Almanac

Uploaded: Fri, May 13, 2022, 9:31 am

With a slogan hinting at her top campaign priority, "Our Environment, Our Future," Laura Parmer-Lohan, former mayor of San Carlos, has established herself in the District 3 Supervisor race as the candidate who wants to take an aggressive stance on climate change initiatives for San Mateo County.

A position that distinguishes her most from the three other candidates is her firm support for the parcel tax measure that will fund preventative measures against wildfires and rising sea levels. (The tax measure will be voted on by residents.)

For Parmer-Lohan, it's a necessity when looking at about half a dozen capital-intensive projects throughout the county that require attention, including an early flood warning system, Belmont Creek restoration and other projects outlined by OneShoreline or the San Mateo County Flood and Seal Level Rise Resiliency District which formed in 2020.

Separate from the projects that could be funded by the tax measure, Parmer-Lohan said that there's a number of issues currently facing the county due to rising sea levels, citing the king tides in Pacifica that are eroding the pier and cliff near the homes on Beach Boulevard and Highway 1 by Surfer's Beach in Half Moon Bay that is only temporarily protected by a riprap.

The opposing candidates point to rising gas prices and inflation as reasons why they can't support another tax measure on county residents at this time. But Parmer-Lohan believes she is addressing her districts' concerns by backing it.

"The community has shared with me that they want bold and swift action when it comes to addressing the impacts of climate change," she said.

A mother to two boys, Parmer-Lohan has held several marketing positions in medical device and biotech companies, is currently the chief of staff at Amgen and runs a small business.

She was inspired to get involved in public service after her son, who was 12 at the time and plans to study environmental energy at University of California, Davis, expressed concerns to her about the future and climate change.

Parmer-Lohan first got a taste of city politics by joining San Carlos' single-family housing advisory committee, reviewing design standards for home remodeling or building projects. In 2018, she won a seat on the San Carlos City Council, where she said she is currently working to go beyond the city's Regional Housing Needs Allocation numbers and has helped create a strong climate action plan for the city.

"Now we have one of the most robust climate action plans, with over 40 different strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as to address the impacts of climate change," she said.

Moving to a position on the board of supervisors, where she can increase the scope of the work she has done as a San Carlos City Council, just seemed like the next natural step, she said.

With climate change at the center of her campaign, Parmer-Lohan proposed developing water recycling and reclaiming programs for use in irrigation, farming and landscaping.

Parmer-Lohan said the city of San Carlos has been able to encourage developers to use recycled water in commercial development projects. On a county level, she said a water recycling program will look different depending on the uses, whether that's for development or farming, and that the trick is to make sure that ultimately the costs to carry out these programs will fit people's budgets.

Parmer-Lohan frames the affordable housing crisis as a climate issue and wants to look at housing policies related to the county's ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, support transit-oriented housing, push for more workforce housing and look at available public lands to build upon.

Similar to the apartments that just opened for the Jefferson Union High School District staff, Parmer-Lohan said that she wants to expand local school district partnerships with the county to build more housing.

For housing for farm workers, Parmer-Lohan said she was interested in a plot of land in Half Moon Bay that used to be the site of the former Bay City Flower Company.

"The lack of housing affects all of us whether we know it or not," she said, adding that gaining support for more housing requires listening to everyone's concerns and getting people to agree on the facts as best as possible.

Parmer-Lohan graduated with a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and received her master's degree at the University of California at Berkeley's Haas School of Busines .

She is endorsed by current District 3 Supervisor Don Horsely; Hector Camacho, president of the San Mateo County Board of Education; two trustees of the San Carlos School District; and a long list of other elected officials. She is also endorsed by the Redwood City Firefighters Association, Planned Parenthood and the National Union of Healthcare Workers. Her full list of endorsements can be found on lauraforsupervisor.com.

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.