News

California election results: Who won? Which propositions passed?

Voters cast their at a vote center in the Town Center in Portola Valley on Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

After tens of millions of dollars in spending, thousands of door knocks and hundreds of attack ads, voting ended Nov. 8 in California — and the verdict of voters is now rolling in.

Among the seven ballot measures, Californians said yes to enshrining "reproductive freedom" in the state constitution, but rejected pricey campaigns that would have allowed sports betting online and at Native American casinos, as well as a tax on millionaires to combat climate change.

In the vote count thus far, no Republican was winning statewide office — something that last happened in 2006. Will Democrats keep their stranglehold on the Legislature with super-majorities? Did either party flip congressional seats, and will it matter for overall control of the U.S. House?

In blowouts, projected winners were called soon after the polls closed at 8 p.m. and early voting results were announced. But very close contests may not be decided for days, if not weeks. California now sends mail ballots to all registered voters, and any ballots postmarked by Election Day will still be counted through Nov. 15. That can delay final results, which will be [v certified in early December.

A roundup of key contests:

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

CalMatters.org is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California's policies and politics. Read more state news from CalMatters here.

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews, Facebook and on Instagram @almanacnews for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

California election results: Who won? Which propositions passed?

by CalMatters staff / CalMatters

Uploaded: Wed, Nov 9, 2022, 3:00 pm

After tens of millions of dollars in spending, thousands of door knocks and hundreds of attack ads, voting ended Nov. 8 in California — and the verdict of voters is now rolling in.

Among the seven ballot measures, Californians said yes to enshrining "reproductive freedom" in the state constitution, but rejected pricey campaigns that would have allowed sports betting online and at Native American casinos, as well as a tax on millionaires to combat climate change.

In the vote count thus far, no Republican was winning statewide office — something that last happened in 2006. Will Democrats keep their stranglehold on the Legislature with super-majorities? Did either party flip congressional seats, and will it matter for overall control of the U.S. House?

In blowouts, projected winners were called soon after the polls closed at 8 p.m. and early voting results were announced. But very close contests may not be decided for days, if not weeks. California now sends mail ballots to all registered voters, and any ballots postmarked by Election Day will still be counted through Nov. 15. That can delay final results, which will be [v certified in early December.

A roundup of key contests:

Governor: Smooth sailing for Newsom

Attorney general: Bonta battles Hochman, crime fears

Controller: Will Chen break GOP winless streak?

Schools superintendent: Thurmond survives parental fury

Treasurer, insurance commissioner: Democrats prevail despite scandal

Lieutenant governor, secretary of state: No strong GOP challenge

State Supreme Court: A quiet, but historic campaign

State Assembly: Which kind of Democrats win?

State Senate: A big change in membership

Congress: California helps decide which party is in charge

Prop. 1: Court fight next on abortion laws?

Props. 26 and 27: A bad bet on sports gambling

Prop. 28: More money for arts and music education

Prop. 30: Clean air and millionaires' taxes

Props. 29, 31: Dialysis and flavored tobacco

CALmatters.org is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California's policies and politics.

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.