Menlo Park approves 'Safe City' ordinance | May 31, 2017 | Almanac | Almanac Online |

Almanac

News - May 31, 2017

Menlo Park approves 'Safe City' ordinance

by Kate Bradshaw

For what was at least the third time, a group of adults and kids sat in on the Menlo Park Council meeting, many of them supporters of two ordinances and a resolution laying out policies on how people who have immigrated illegally to the U.S. should be treated in Menlo Park.

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Comments

8 people like this
Posted by Elsie
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on May 30, 2017 at 12:48 pm

Elsie is a registered user.

Am I understanding this correctly? This would make us a "sanctuary city"? And, if so, why would we want to do this?


16 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on May 30, 2017 at 1:05 pm

"why would we want to do this?"


Lots of reasons, see the article for local law enmforcement response, and from a national perspective, see below:


"Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"

from the LATimes:

"Police chiefs know that today’s unreported domestic violence or sexual assault or robbery can become tomorrow’s reported homicide."

-and-

"First, the current system of enforcement is a logical division of labor in which all parties know what is expected of them. Federal agencies, such as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), enforce immigration laws, which are federal statutes. Local police agencies enforce state and local criminal laws. These roles are compatible and complementary.

Second, local police have their hands full — investigating murders, robberies, sexual assaults, burglaries, thefts and other crimes, and working to prevent these and other crimes from occurring. When local police identify a suspect and have probable cause, they make the arrest, without regard to the suspect’s immigration status.

Finally, police chiefs warn that if their agencies are required to enforce federal immigration laws, it will hurt their ability to investigate and solve serious crimes in their communities. If people are afraid to have contact with the local police, they will not report crime, serve as witnesses, or tell police what is going on in their neighborhoods. Without information from the community, investigating crime becomes difficult and crime levels rise."

----

Support Menlo Park's finest - support Safe City status.


11 people like this
Posted by Elsie
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on May 30, 2017 at 1:17 pm

Elsie is a registered user.

You're telling me that Sanctuary Cities keep crime down? Doesn't a sanctuary city mean criminals can come here w/o fear of being arrested? Am I missing something?


14 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on May 30, 2017 at 1:51 pm

"Am I missing something?"

Yes, apparently. I would say "yes, obviously" but I think you do actually understand and our throwing strawmen in the way.

"Doesn't a sanctuary city mean criminals can come here w/o fear of being arrested?"

Yup, a straw man. How can you even type that? That is so disrespectful of our great police and sheriff employees.


10 people like this
Posted by Jane Gill
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on May 30, 2017 at 7:51 pm


No laws regarding immigration have changed in the past four months. What is different is that the Trump administration is ENFORCING laws that have been on the books since the Bush 43 and Obama administrations.

If Menlo Park decides to become what is tantamount to a "Sanctuary City," do I then have the choice of how much of my property taxes I wish to pay?


8 people like this
Posted by pdj
a resident of Menlo Park: Belle Haven
on May 31, 2017 at 10:19 am

pdj is a registered user.

Here is the link for the Menlo Park City Council meeting on 5/23/2017.
Web Link
The discussion is at 2:00:00 to 4:00:00 hours of the video.

If you were not at the meeting, you may find it helpful to know first hand what was discussed.


2 people like this
Posted by Sherlock
a resident of Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on May 31, 2017 at 10:46 am

Great example of what is really happening.

Web Link


13 people like this
Posted by Brian
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on May 31, 2017 at 11:01 am

There is not one good reason to do this. Without the "safe Cites" or "Sanctuary Cities" label Menlo Park was already do this. Now our city council has decided to paint a target on the city. If Menlo Park loses funding because of this decision I hope the residents take action, sue the city council and replace them. I would really like to see these decisions go to a city wide vote and not be left up to 5 people who poorly represent the population of Menlo Park.

I wonder how long it will be before ICE starts targeting "sanctuary cities"? They have already done raids in Santa Cruz, seems likely that they will target other cities that decide to ignore immigration law.


Like this comment
Posted by Sherlock
a resident of Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on May 31, 2017 at 11:10 am

A Trump administration order to deport a man who entered the country illegally nearly three decades ago and became a respected businessman in Hawaii was "inhumane" and "contrary to the values of the country and its legal system," a federal judge wrote Tuesday in an unusually impassioned opinion.

"President Trump has claimed that his immigration policies would target the 'bad hombres,'" 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Stephen Reinhardt said. "The government's decision to remove Magana Ortiz shows that even the 'good hombres' are not safe."

Reinhardt said the 9th Circuit lacked authority to block the March order to deport Ortiz to Mexico. Still, he said it was difficult to see how the order was consistent with President Donald Trump's promise of an immigration system with heart.

Reinhardt said Ortiz, who came to the U.S. in 1989, was well-established in Hawaii's coffee farming industry, paid his taxes and had three U.S. citizen children from whom he would be torn away.

Nicole Navas, a U.S. Department of Justice spokeswoman, said the agency declined comment on the case.

His opinion in the Ortiz case came as the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with a Mexican immigrant who faced deportation after he was convicted of having consensual sex with his underage girlfriend.

The justices ruled unanimously that Juan Esquivel-Quintana had committed a crime under California law, but his conduct did not violate federal immigration law.

The rulings come against a backdrop of stepped up immigration enforcement by the Trump administration. U.S. immigration arrests increased nearly 40 percent in early 2017 from a comparable period last year, according to figures provided by immigration officials. However, actual deportations were down from late January to late April compared with a year ago.

Ortiz, 43, won a reprieve from deportation in 2014 and was seeking legal status on the basis that his wife and children are U.S. citizens when the government "without any explanation" ordered him in March to report for removal the next month, according to Reinhardt.

Ortiz has at least one conviction for driving under the influence, but Reinhardt said that was not the basis for his removal order.

Ortiz appealed to the 9th Circuit in an effort to block the removal order. Now, he will be returned to Mexico and face a 10-year bar on his return, the judge said.


5 people like this
Posted by Brian
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on May 31, 2017 at 12:40 pm

"Ortiz has at least one conviction for driving under the influence, but Reinhardt said that was not the basis for his removal order."

In this article you seem to be arguing that Ortiz is a "good hombre" but in my book driving under the influence is a pretty serious crime, and a felony, and one that puts many people at risk. You can get punished pretty severely if you are a citizen, if you are not here legally why shouldn't this be grounds for deportation?

I do not advocate deporting everyone who is in the US illegally, most people are hard working, honest people trying to make a living and there should be a path for them to become citizens. There is no reason to ask immigration status even in misdemeanor cases (traffic violations, petty theft, shoplifting, etc.) but once you are arrested for any felony and are convicted if you are not here legally then you should be sent back to your country.


2 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on May 31, 2017 at 1:26 pm

Last two posts - 500 words on an anecdotal case based IN HAWAII.

Meanwhile, back home...

- "There is not one good reason to do this."

True - not one good reason - there are many. Since you want one, here it is, yet again: "Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"

What do you have against supporting Law Enforcement and lowering crime?


- "our city council has decided to paint a target on the city"

Not even.

- "not be left up to 5 people who ('poorly' - your opinion) represent the population of Menlo Park"

Actually, that is how it DOES work Web Link - see also: Trump, Donald J.

Whoops, bad example - as he is an infantile Liar, with the added bonus of being highly ineffective. Unfortunately, you happen to be one of the few around here who believe him.


13 people like this
Posted by Brian
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on May 31, 2017 at 2:04 pm

Brian is a registered user.

Well Law and Order,

Can you show me statistics from reputable sources that back up your claims? Then maybe you will explain how they apply to a small city like Menlo Park which already has a pretty low crime rate. Menlo Park was already practicing these policies and doing so under the radar. Declaring itself a sanctuary city makes it show up on the radar. I won't be surprised if , in addition to taking aim at federal funding for sanctuary cities, the current administration also steps up ICE enforcement in those cities. Were I an illegal immigrant, I am not my family immigrated legally, I would be more worried about enforcement now that two weeks ago.

I am still waiting to hear you "many good reasons".


6 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on May 31, 2017 at 2:18 pm

What claims did I make that haven't been backed up?

Your fear-based fantasies, completely lack justification:

"in addition to taking aim at federal funding for sanctuary cities"

Show us how Trump's blustering will actually take effect. It would just be another Trump court loss (lots of those lately, eh?)

"I won't be surprised if...the current administration also steps up ICE enforcement in those cities"

That's a claim? "I won't be surprised if"

Okay. Way to boldly state your prediction.

"Were I an illegal immigrant, ... I would be more worried about enforcement now that two weeks ago."

Why? And try to describe it without "Were I.." and "I won't be surprised if..."

"Many good reasons"? You asked for one ("There is not one good reason to do this.") I gave it to you, and I'll stick with it until you address it: "Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down" Web Link

What do you have against supporting Law Enforcement and lowering crime?


7 people like this
Posted by Brian
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on May 31, 2017 at 3:29 pm

Brian is a registered user.

Law and Order

Obviously the name is misleading since you advocate not following federal law, but be that as it may can you tell me one thing that changes for Menlo Park after becoming a "sanctuary city" that was not happening before? I don't really the schools reporting illegal students (Not that the school district is actually impacted by the Sanctuary City designation) nor were the Menlo Park police holding people for ICE (that would require we have a jail. The Sheriff department, which does run the county jail, is also not affected by the Sanctuary City. The article is interesting, but focuses on larger cities. Do you have any information on smaller cities and the types of crime impacting Menlo Park.

I completely disagree with Sanctuary City and I support city wide vote on the topic. Something that has the potential of impacting the city in this manner should be decided by more than the 5 city council members and a handful of teachers and kids.

If you don't support it that is fine


7 people like this
Posted by Margaret
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on May 31, 2017 at 3:48 pm

Apparently, I'm totally out of touch here. Doesn't "sanctuary city" mean that criminals of every level can come to our city without fear of being arrested or harassed? What am I missing? And if that's correct, why on earth would we think that's okay?


8 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on May 31, 2017 at 3:50 pm

"Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"

"The article is interesting, but focuses on larger cities. Do you have any information on smaller cities and the types of crime impacting Menlo Park."

No, not at hand. Do you have anything? Anything that will back up your claims?

And please, try to avoid the ad hominem attack on a name chosen by the only poster here who is supporting local law enforcement.

"Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"


12 people like this
Posted by bad tonic
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on May 31, 2017 at 8:40 pm

"Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"

Are folk consciously ignoring this? Did they read the full article?

Are they Fox viewers?

I do not understand.


2 people like this
Posted by Police Chiefs
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on May 31, 2017 at 11:24 pm

The problem with listening to police chiefs is their "opinions" reflect politics, not necessarily effective policy. Police chiefs serve at the pleasure of the city council and/or mayor. If the chief falls out of favor with them, then he's out of a job. In Oakland, Libby Schaaf cycled through several police chiefs as each one didn't meet her political expectations for various reasons.

In big cities, selecting a police chief is not so much who is most effective fighting crime. Rather, the person chosen is the most politically acceptable or satisfies a political constituency. Their job security is based on how well they help their bosses politically.

For a more honest opinion on effective policing public policy, ask the rank and file or law enforcement middle management in private. They will have less of a political agenda and tell you what works and what doesn't.


4 people like this
Posted by Dorothy Fadiman
a resident of Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on Jun 1, 2017 at 8:39 am

Menlo Park is actually now a "Safe City", not yet a Sanctuary City. Several of you asked for statistics:
This recent article appeared in a respected Washington, DC publciation, The Hill.
Web Link "Immigrants commit crimes and are incarcerated at a much lower rate than U.S. citizens, according to two separate studies released this week. A study by The Sentencing Project, a criminal justice research and advocacy group, found that "foreign-born residents of the United States commit crime less often than native-born citizens."
Another study, by the libertarian Cato Institute, compares incarceration rates by migratory status, ethnicity and gender. "All immigrants are less likely to be incarcerated than natives relative to their shares of the population," the Cato study reads."
And I personally want to thank the Almanac Staff for this editorial (and Mayor Kirsten Keith for her support):
Web Link
which states: "We are in full support of the Menlo Park City Council's decision to go down this path, which may in the future prove necessary to prevent families from being torn apart and individuals from being ghettoized and unduly scrutinized on the basis of their religion."


14 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Jun 1, 2017 at 9:56 am

"The problem with listening to police chiefs is their "opinions" reflect politics, not necessarily effective policy."

lmftfy

"The problem with listening to POSTERS is their "opinions" reflect politics AND THEIR BIAS, not necessarily effective policy."

So let's look at published facts:

"Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"

"Immigrants commit crimes and are incarcerated at a much lower rate than U.S. citizens"

"All immigrants are less likely to be incarcerated than natives relative to their shares of the population," the Cato study reads."


8 people like this
Posted by Police Chiefs
a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Jun 1, 2017 at 6:20 pm

@Law and Order

The Cato study uses incarceration rates, which are very different from crime rates. It's much harder to track down a transient suspect than one with roots in the community. Illegal immigrants are more transient on average than legal residents. Most illegal immigration is due to economic reasons. They go where the work is and take temporary jobs, such as working farms or construction. When they find a place to live, they don't use their real identity or rent a place off the books or under a friend's or relative's name.

If law enforcement were better at incarcerating everyone who broke the law, then you would see a higher percentage of illegal immigrants in prison. Instead, you only see a small percentage.

It's certainly possible that the lower incarceration rate is due to illegal immigrants committing fewer serious crimes. However, you can't tell from incarceration data without controlling for other factors that account for the lower rates.

As the saying goes, correlation is not causation.

If you put so much faith in what what law enforcement leaders think, why does the city council need to weigh in at all? Just let Menlo Park police set the policy that best protects the public.

BTW, the San Mateo County Sheriff is very cooperative with ICE.
Web Link


6 people like this
Posted by True colors
a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Jun 2, 2017 at 9:18 am

Web Link

If our criminal defense attorney Mayor Kirsten Keith had her way the city would never cooperate with ICE!! Great work by the Mercury News getting her to admit this publicly. She is up for re-election next year.


12 people like this
Posted by Law AND Order
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Jun 2, 2017 at 10:48 am

First, it is: "Police Chiefs can't be trusted because, politics"

Then: "All the facts are being misinterpreted, 'Cato is playing with numbers', 'It's certainly possible...' and 'As the saying goes...'"

C'mon.

[Portion removed.]


******

Let's look at published facts:

"Police chiefs across the country support sanctuary cities because they keep crime down"

"Immigrants commit crimes and are incarcerated at a much lower rate than U.S. citizens"

"All immigrants are less likely to be incarcerated than natives relative to their shares of the population," the Cato study reads."


Like this comment
Posted by public record
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Jun 2, 2017 at 2:21 pm

@True_colors praises the Mercury News for "getting [the mayor] to admit [something] publicly"

Actually, the quotes from the mayor in that article appear to be taken from the transcript of the council meeting.


4 people like this
Posted by pogo
a resident of Woodside: other
on Jun 3, 2017 at 7:45 am

pogo is a registered user.

It's difficult to determine a group's crime rate when you don't know the total number in the group. Many of the studies cited by the media compare illegal aliens to a group carefully and narrowly defined as "young males with a high school education or less." That may be appropriate but it hardly compares crime rates for "illegal" to "legal." Whether the criminal completed high school is probably less relevant to the victim than having the criminal in the country illegally.

According to the FBI and General Accounting Office, criminal aliens committed 22% to 37% of all murders. Depending on how you define them, undocumented aliens represent just 3.5% to 8.2% of the population. Illegal aliens commit murders at 3x to 10x their legal peers.

Web Link

Web Link


Like this comment
Posted by POC
a resident of Woodside High School
on Jun 3, 2017 at 1:07 pm

True Colors????

Now ya just trollin', bruh....


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

 

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