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Atherton to begin testing license plate readers, security cameras to deter crime

Original post made on Oct 8, 2019

In response to a rash of 20 residential burglaries in Atherton over a four-month period, the City Council directed town staff to begin testing license plate readers and security cameras around town.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Tuesday, October 8, 2019, 11:49 AM

Comments (33)

14 people like this
Posted by LOL!!!
a resident of another community
on Oct 8, 2019 at 12:39 pm

Because aaaaall the other towns that have used it and noticed no significant decrease prove that it'll work for Atherton? Hahaha.

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again but expecting a different result. I feel this is simply to placate the citizens.


116 people like this
Posted by laughing
a resident of another community
on Oct 8, 2019 at 1:06 pm

Here is a novel idea...get rid of the overpaid, lazy do nothing Atherton Police and bring in the Sheriff's Office. You will save MILLIONS and receive real Law Enforcement service. Problem solved.


1 person likes this
Posted by Boris Badenov
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 8, 2019 at 1:25 pm

The only plates collected will be the normal citizenry. The "bad'uns" use stolen plates, plate covers or avoid the readers by going down a back street.
[Portion removed]


Like this comment
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 8, 2019 at 2:38 pm

@LOL @Boris

Here's a study showing ALPRs to be effective in identifying stolen cars and those with lost or stolen plates.

Web Link

If someone obscures one's license plate and a human officer sees it, the officer can pull the car over. That's immediately suspicious and not legal.


1 person likes this
Posted by Boris Badenov
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 8, 2019 at 4:19 pm

The entire Conclusion of the study:
"Conclusion
There are many challenges to an evidence-based policing approach, especially when attempting an RCT. Policing deals with real lives, concerns, and consequences—it doesn’t happen within a controlled
laboratory environment, and it is often difficult to measure intention and meaning. Law enforcement executives also often have to contend with political pressures both externally and internally.

However, despite the challenges, the law enforcement profession must do more than make policing a “check-the-box” concept.
Evidence-based policing can enhance traditions and good instincts while empowering officers to be more effective by using science and data. With limited resources,
the VPD designed and implemented an easily replicable and useful study. Other departments can do the same."

re: stolen cars - lots of stolen cars in Lindenwood? I missed that.

re: plate covers - I see them a lot. I don't see anyone getting pulled over for them.


1 person likes this
Posted by Robert Cronin
a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows
on Oct 8, 2019 at 4:40 pm

Robert Cronin is a registered user.

If you install license plate readers and don't also implement facial recognition, the criminal bicycle element will escape detection.


5 people like this
Posted by Where has this worked?
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 8, 2019 at 5:00 pm

What city that has tried it has deemed it successful?
The CC has no ideas and supports a proven BAD idea just to say they're doing something.
This has been a proven failure many times over.
Portola Valley tried it...guess what happened? EXACTLY! They wasted a bunch of money and decided to not implement it.
GEE! It'll work here though, Right??
GAWD, please learn from the mistakes of others.
When this is deemed ineffective for the cost (and it will be) we can all look back and laugh at the money they wasted, knowingly wasted I should say.

Oh and what are the specifics of their plan (this is the best part)
THEY HAVE NONE! HAW!

Seriously, It's a sad and irresponsible waste of our money.


1 person likes this
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 8, 2019 at 7:59 pm

@Boris

The Trial and Results section provides a quantitative measurement of ALPR effectiveness for Vallejo.

Stolen cars from Atherton are not a problem. Stolen cars or plates used to commit burglaries can be a problem. More sophisticated criminals are less likely to use their own car or plates to commit crimes when that evidence could be traced back to them. It does appear that most burglars targeting Atherton are of the sophisticated variety.

re: plate covers. As long as the plate is not obscuring the letters, numbers, and registration, it won't draw law enforcement's attention.

@Where has this worked?
See my link to the Vallejo study. Also, Portola Valley did implement ALPRs and they found value in it.
Web Link


Like this comment
Posted by Sylvio Burlusconiibologna
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 8, 2019 at 8:20 pm

I only use plates from cars that won't be found, they're good for a couple hours.

And never been pulled over with my plate diffuser or get charged by fasttrack at bridges.

And there's 2 uncovered ways in/out of pv.

Go ahead and waste a hundred grand.


Like this comment
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 9, 2019 at 12:22 pm

@Sylvio

No wonder you live in Atherton. You are an extremely sophisticated at evading authority. :-)

The most sophisticated criminals will always be difficult to catch. As police improve their tools and techniques, criminals must spend more time and effort to evade authority.

Crime will never be eliminated. It can only be dettered and punished. The question is how to do it cost effectively. Hiring another police officer for Atherton will cost more than one hundred grand and be a recurring expense every year.

An ALPR system that makes the current police personnel more productive and deters crime could be more cost-effective.

The Atherton staff report has the ALPR experiences of nearby communities if you are interested:
Web Link


Like this comment
Posted by Boris Badenov
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 9, 2019 at 2:42 pm

The APD report talks about a lot of agencies that claim (without numbers) a modicum of success, and *seem* happy. Only 1 of 8 can point to even incremental help on more than a single incident.

Well, then.

Case in point, the first one - Piedmont (*seems* most similar to Atherton?)

"Through a combination of both **security** and ALPR, Piedmont was able to solve a home invasion robbery that occurred in January of 2019. Other than the substantial expenses and a handful of misreads, Piedmont **seems** to have benefitted from their ALPR and security cameras."

Ah, that magical word pops up again: "seems". Seems like it maybe, might, oughta, could, perhaps, possibly, even conceivably, be worth it. Well, seems so.

Seems like the correct word might be "unseemly".


3 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 9, 2019 at 3:31 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"The CC has no ideas and supports a proven BAD idea just to say they're doing something."

Yep, that is their modus operandi on most issues.


Like this comment
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 9, 2019 at 4:51 pm

@Boris

Compiling the numbers for those agencies probably would have required a bit of work to sift through cases and categorize whether ALPR assisted or did not assist in an investigation. I would not expect an agency representative to be familiar with all the ALPR-related cases in a police department. That's probably why the info was more anecdotal than quantitative.

Feel free to work with APD to on what quantitative measures to record to measure program success or lack thereof. It's your right as a resident to state your opinion, but to turn your opinion into action, you have to get involved.


9 people like this
Posted by No resources
a resident of Menlo Park: Fair Oaks
on Oct 9, 2019 at 6:49 pm

Ok so even if they get some leads from the plate readers whats next? Does Atherton even have a detective? Having a police department this small is a waste of taxpayer money. Let the sheriff department take them over.


Like this comment
Posted by Sylvio Burlusconiibologna
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 9, 2019 at 8:58 pm

All these alpr just to catch a couple stolen cars passing thru Atherton on ecr. Pathetic.


1 person likes this
Posted by Let's get real
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 9, 2019 at 9:16 pm

When people make comments like the Atherton Police are "lazy" and "do nothing", it takes credibility away from the (correct) argument that Atherton should outsource its police services, because it makes it easy for politicos to write it off as ranting.

I'm not a fan, but they're not doing nothing, and I don't think they're any lazier than any other police department. I would agree they are paid a lot, and it can be argued too much given the relatively peaceful work environment in Atherton (relative lack of hazard).

The actual issue with the Atherton Police is that Atherton is so small that the percentage of police budget that goes for overhead (i.e., resources other than cops out on patrol fighting crime) is ridiculously high. Dispatch, chief…in larger cities, are a small part of the overall cost. In Atherton, it's huge.

The net result is we pay very high budgetary costs for the police department, but are not getting a commensurate amount of crime prevention.

The correct decision is to outsource. Historically it hasn't happened because the police union has supported council candidates who have conveniently ignored these realities.


2 people like this
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 10, 2019 at 7:33 am

@No Resources
Atherton has 2 detectives.

@Let's Get Real
You're right that Atherton could save money by outsourcing police. We could even lower service levels and probably not see markedly higher crime rates. However, I don't think a majority of Atherton voters want to outsource. They like the concierge and personalized service APD provides. It's not just crime rates they are looking at. It's the responsiveness and service quality when there is a call for help.

Would the sheriff do the same if Atherton outsourced? No. Unincorporated county areas have more significant crime at higher rates. The sheriff would lose the next election if he devoted resources in proportion to the tax revenue Atherton was contributing. I've heard stories about APD going above and beyond to help out residents that extend beyond strictly law enforcement. The sheriff can't do that lest he be seen as catering to the rich.


1 person likes this
Posted by Let's get real
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 10, 2019 at 8:36 am

@ALPR study, you misunderstand my point. Atherton can save money by outsourcing police. It can also achieve higher service levels for the same or less money. Right now the perception of responsiveness is faux. For less money, we would get more actual police resources, which necessarily translates into better crime fighting responsiveness.

I don't really believe Atherton residents would say pay more for the stories you've heard about "above and beyond". Instead, they're presented with "do you want to pay for the responsive APD, etc. etc." without a true picture of what the differential in service level would be.

Again, it's axiomatic that if Atherton is spending, let's say, $6M on the APD now, $2M of that is overhead, and spent $4.5M with the Sheriff, the effective police services APD is $4M versus $4.5M from the Sheriff, and the Sheriff would be providing more actual police services for $1.5M less actual cost per year.

(These numbers are more or less made up, but illustrate the point of how the very high overhead cost is detracting from what residents think they're paying for).


2 people like this
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 10, 2019 at 10:39 am

@Let's get real

When I say "responsiveness", I don't mean time to respond. I mean willingness to accommodate. For example, will the sheriff's office set up house alarm monitoring hooked up directly into its dispatch center? Will it conduct frequent, free vacation house checks at resident request? Will it send out patrol officers to monitor intersections that motorists are speeding through at resident request? Will it drive your kids to school if your car won't start one morning?

The sheriff could theoretically provide this service level for just Atherton with the extra revenue coming in from the town's contract. But the sheriff doesn't have the financial ability to do this for other communities. It then becomes impossible to provide this service level for just Atherton due to the political optics.

You are absolutely right on the finances. Atherton will save money and have the same level of patrol and detectives working on cases. But you are wrong on the politics. Atherton residents want the specialized services. They want the customer service focus. Those won't be there when police services shift to the sheriff.


42 people like this
Posted by laughing
a resident of another community
on Oct 10, 2019 at 11:45 am

ALPR...The Sheriff's Office serves Woodside, Ladera, Portola Valley and other very wealthy areas on the Peninsula. I am pretty sure they can take on little teeny Atherton with zero businesses and very very low crime. Get real. The money saved would be massive! Atherton PD currently relies on Menlo Park PD to catch fleeing skate board "criminals" and if there was a large crime (such as the one and only homicide in the history of the Town of Atherton) they rely on the Sheriff's many many many Detectives to come in and solve it for them...as was accomplished in the one and only homicide. Case closed by the San Mateo County Sheriff's Office. MILLIONS would be saved for other needs of the Town. Stop the wasting.


20 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 10, 2019 at 2:32 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"The sheriff could theoretically provide this service level for just Atherton with the extra revenue coming in from the town's contract. But the sheriff doesn't have the financial ability to do this for other communities. It then becomes impossible to provide this service level for just Atherton due to the political optics."

Wrong. The Sheriff contracts to provide services to incorporated areas on a case-by-case basis. Each incorporated area determines the level of service which it wants to purchase and the Sheriff then prices the contract accordingly.

Woodside pays for and gets more services than does Portola Valley. And Woodside gets Atherton level services for about 50% of what its costs Atherton to have its own police department.


Like this comment
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 10, 2019 at 4:54 pm

@Peter

If Woodside gets the same level of service as Atherton, how do Woodside residents hook their alarms systems directly into the sheriff's dispatch? Does the sheriff hold onto resident keys in case they lock themselves out? I don't believe the sheriff offers these options.

Will the sheriff be guaranteeing vacation checks at the same resident requested intervals as the APD performs or will it be best effort only? Ultimately, Atherton doesn't have the ability to enforce service levels on the sheriff in an outsourcing agreement. One of the benefits of in-sourcing is greater control over service quality.


@laughing
I agree outsourcing would lead to savings. Yet, that's not enough of a reason for Atherton residents to outsource. When the last major recession hit, Atherton outsourced a couple departments to conserve cash. It still kept the police in house. It kept renewing its parcel tax. If the only issue was saving money, Atherton would never have had a parcel tax in the first place, especially with its two thirds requirement for approval.


7 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 10, 2019 at 4:59 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

" Ultimately, Atherton doesn't have the ability to enforce service levels on the sheriff in an outsourcing agreement. "

Wrong. The Sheriff's service agreement is a contract with all of the enforceability of any well written contract. Just ask Woodside.

I discussed this at length with a previous Woodside Mayor and he was quite positive about their outsourcing to the Sheriff including Woodside's ability to easily adjust service levels.



15 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 10, 2019 at 5:04 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"When the last major recession hit, Atherton outsourced a couple departments to conserve cash. It still kept the police in house. It kept renewing its parcel tax."

Wrong. The last parcel tax was soundly defeated and given the huge increase in revenues from the increased property values I predict there will not be another taxpayer approved parcel tax for years to come.

Given that the Town Council has been unsuccessful in their attempt to steal tax revenues from the Fire District they are now simply going to have to live within their means.


13 people like this
Posted by Let’s get real
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 10, 2019 at 9:56 pm

Peter, if only that were true. Unfortunately for the residents, the council has figured yet another end run around living within its means.Taking out “certificates of participation“ without taxpayer permission to borrow this money to build a new Taj Mahal. Another economic problem that could be solved in a much more taxpayer friendly way by either outsourcing the police, or concluding they don’t need fancy offices if they are actually performing what we are paying him to do: be out on the streets to fight crime.


15 people like this
Posted by Peek into the pre-robbing criminal's prep
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 11, 2019 at 9:54 am

Perp 1: OK we're gonna rob that place in Atherton tomorrow.

Perp 2: Yah but i heard they have lic plate readers now

Perp 1: No problem, print a paper plate or change the 3 into an 8 on the stolen car's plate. Now lets go.

Tell me again, how much will this cost and how well will it work?


Like this comment
Posted by ALPR study
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 11, 2019 at 4:17 pm

@Peter

So what happens when the sheriff can't meet minimum service levels, such as response time or promised services that turn out too expensive to deliver? Does Woodside get a partial rebate and the sheriff's office just has to eat the cost? It sounds like you've seen the contract since you attest to its enforceability. Please share if you have link.

It's great Woodside has a contract, but the devil is in the details.

I wanted to point out that the last major recession hit in 2008. The parcel tax was renewed in 2009 at 78%
Web Link)

And again in 2013 at 73%.
Web Link)

In 2017, the parcel tax got 53%. It still had majority support of the residents, just not a super majority.
Web Link)


@Peek
It's almost virtually assured that an altered plate will be flagged by ALPR for being invalid or expired. The perps have to luck into the 3 to 8 conversion becoming a valid plate.

At the same time, we do not require new police tools to be perfect. We expect them to improve the productivity of our current police force at a cost effective price.


3 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 11, 2019 at 4:23 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

ALPR - Please feel free to ask Woodside for their current contract. It is useful to do your own research.

Re parcel tax notice the approval trend 78%, 73% and 53% - I doubt the Town could get 66 2/3% next time around.


3 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 11, 2019 at 4:36 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

Here is verbage from the Staff report on the 2013 Woodside contract - the Almanac does NOT allow me to post links to my files:

The Town has historically contracted with the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office for necessary
police protection services. The current contract expires on June 30, 2012. A new agreement
has been negotiated, covering the three year period ending June 30, 2015. It provides for a
continuation of the current level of basic services, which includes patrol services and public
safety dispatch on a 24-hour, seven-day a week basis. Under the terms of the contract, the
Town has one deputy on duty during the day shift (6 AM – 6 PM) and two deputies on duty
during the night shift (6 PM – 6 AM) and peak periods.
These personnel are enhanced by one additional deputy on duty during the day shift which is
supported by the State Supplemental Law Enforcement Services Account (SLESA) Citizens’
Option for Public Safety (COPS) Program. All of these deputies are shared with the Town of
Portola Valley.
The contract also includes one additional deputy on a motorcycle patrol unit, which serves
only the Town of Woodside four days a week, ten hours each day.
The current contract expires on June 30, 2009. An agreement to begin a new contract has
been negotiated that would maintain the current level of service. The following table
summarizes the costs to the Town for 2011-12 and the three-year period of the new contract
that has been negotiated for police services:
Service Component 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Basic Services $835,987 $861,276 $887,115 $913,728
Dispatch Service $81,906 $84,363 $86,893 $89,501
COPS Program $240,155 $251,868 $259,424 $267,206
Motorcycle Unit $242,720 $253,786 $261,399 $269,241
Subtotal $1,400,768 $1,451,293 $1,494,831 $1,539,676
Less: State COPS Funds ($100,000) ($100,000) ($100,000) ($100,000)
Net General Fund Cost $1,300,768 $1,351,293 $1,394,831 $1,439,676

And here is the services definition in that contract:

EXHIBIT A – SERVICES
AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE COUNTY OF SAN MATEO AND
THE TOWN OF WOODSIDE
In consideration of the payments set forth in Exhibit B, County shall provide Town with the following services:
1. DESCRIPTION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES PROVIDED BY COUNTY.
County shall provide law enforcement services, including law enforcement dispatch services, to Town. Except
as otherwise hereinafter specifically set forth, such services shall only encompass duties and functions of the
type coming within the jurisdiction of, and customarily rendered by the Sheriff’s Office or by County Public
Safety Communications.
The parties agree that the County may provide a greater level of service as is appropriate and necessary to
respond to emergent law enforcement circumstances and situations, and that this determination shall be at
the sole discretion of the County Sheriff.
The incorporated limits of Town may be part of a portion of a larger Sheriff's beat, the boundaries of said beat
or beats to be determined by the Sheriff. Notification of Town shall be made by the Sheriff prior to any
change in beat structure of the patrol servicing Town. Should Town desire to receive any service from the
Sheriff not specifically listed above, it shall so notify Sheriff in writing.
For the purpose of performing said functions, County shall furnish and supply all necessary labor, supervision,
equipment, communication facilities, and supplies necessary to maintain the level of service to be rendered
hereunder.
A. BASIC SERVICES.
1) Township‐wide patrol services on a 24 hour, seven‐days a week basis.
2) Public Safety Dispatch 24 hour, seven‐days a week.
3) Basic traffic and bicycle law enforcement.
4) Parking enforcement and citation processing services.
5) Special security details (i.e., bicycle and running events, 4th of July Parade, Presidential visits, Noon‐time Riders
bicycle group travel monitoring & enforcement, rodeos, King’s Mountain Arts Fair, farmers markets, etc.)
6) Crime reports, investigation, surveillance and apprehension and arrest of suspects.
7) Transportation of suspects to County jail.
8) Presentations and participation at various Town meetings and neighborhood groups.
9) Crime prevention activities.
10) Quarterly statistical reports.
B. SPECIAL SERVICES.
1) K‐9 Deputy available for special services.
2) Emergency manpower availability during emergency situations.
3) School Resource Officer assigned to local schools.
 D.A.R.E. Programs.
 Sober Graduations.
 Government classes.
 Counseling.
EXHIBIT A ‐ SERVICES
AGREEMENT: TOWN OF WOODSIDE | SAN MATEO COUNTY Page 8 of 12
 Other courses available.
4) Special investigative services.
 Narcotics Task Force (NTF).
 Vehicle Theft Task Force (VTTF).
 The Sheriff will provide these services on behalf of the Town, and the payments made
to the County under this agreement include compensation for NTF and VTTF services.
Therefore, the Town will not be a signatory to any other agreements for NTF or VTTF
services.
5) Search and rescue services.
6) Emergency Service Bureau services.
 Short‐term traffic control (parades, community and special events.)
 Presidential visits/events.
 Bomb Squad.
 Hostage negotiations / SWAT.
7) Press Releases and media support.
C. MOTORCYCLE PATROL SERVICES (TOWN OF WOODSIDE ONLY).
The Sheriff will provide Town with a motorcycle patrol unit (1 deputy/1 motorcycle) to perform patrol
services. Deputy will provide services four (4) days per week, 10 hours each day, based on the Sheriff’s
10‐4 Plan.


3 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 11, 2019 at 5:01 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

ALRP - if you provide an email address I will send you the 2013 Woodside contract.


4 people like this
Posted by Inquiring minds
a resident of Atherton: West Atherton
on Oct 12, 2019 at 8:38 am

To "ALPR Study":

You seem very certain that a great majority of Atherton residents are okay with spending extra millions per year for a police force in which they get less crime fighting, but concierge service like holding on to residential keys. In the meantime, we don't have adequate roads or drainage, and our property values have to be suffering because of that.

Where's the actual data to back this up? I guess it's possible, but seems to defy common sense on a practical level.

How come we're not doing a survey, with the pro and con arguments, to put this issue to certainty once and for all?

After all, wouldn't it be cheaper to call a locksmith in the oft chance one is locked out (it's never happened to me) than to pay that share of the millions year in and year out?


3 people like this
Posted by Menlo Voter.
a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Oct 12, 2019 at 5:52 pm

Menlo Voter. is a registered user.

Atherton could get very good police services for half the cost from the Sheriff's dept. If they really want the "concierge" services they can employ a security service that can provide all of those services for significantly less money than will be saved by contracting with the Sheriff.

Makes one wonder what the real reason for having their own police force. A break on traffic tickets? A ride home if they get stopped for DUI? Can only imagine because fiscally it makes no sense to maintain their own police force.


2 people like this
Posted by Let's get real
a resident of Atherton: other
on Oct 12, 2019 at 6:58 pm

Menlo Voter, that is what Bel Air does (LAPD plus private security) and it works well for them. You're right; there's no valid reason that couldn't be a better alternative here.


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