News

Atherton resident, Warriors investor Mark Stevens receives one-year ban from NBA games after pushing player

Stevens says 'I need to be better' in apology

Atherton resident and Golden State Warriors minority investor Mark Stevens has been fined $500,000 and barred from attending NBA games and Warriors team activities for one year after pushing a Toronto Raptors player and "directing obscene language" toward him during Game 3 of the NBA Finals on Wednesday night (June 5), according to a statement released Thursday.

Stevens, who is the managing partner of S-Cubed Capital, an investment holding company in Menlo Park, was sitting courtside at the game at Oracle Arena in Oakland when, during the fourth quarter, Raptors player Kyle Lowry landed near him in the seats after attempting to keep a ball from going out of bounds.

Stevens could be seen shoving Lowry's left shoulder and was also "directing obscene language" toward Lowry before the player got up, according to a joint statement from the NBA and Warriors. Stevens was ejected from the game after the incident.

Stevens' ban is effective immediately.

In a statement issued Thursday, Mike Bass, the NBA's executive vice president for communications, said: "A team representative must be held to the highest possible standard and the conduct of Golden State Warriors investor Mark Stevens last night was beyond unacceptable and has no place in our league."

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Asked about the incident after the game, Lowry said in an ESPN interview: "He reached over and put his hands on me for no reason, then he said ... some vulgar words to me repeatedly. In our league, there's no place for that and honestly I hope he's never allowed to come to an NBA game."

The moment went viral on Thursday amid calls for further repercussions after Axios first revealed Stevens' identity. Some NBA fans on social media have argued that Stevens should be forced to sell his ownership stake in the Warriors.

NBA superstar LeBron James said in an Instagram post Thursday that as a minority owner, Stevens "knew exactly what he was doing which was so uncalled for."

"When you sit courtside you absolutely know what comes with being on the floor and if you don’t know it’s on the back on the ticket itself that states the guidelines," James wrote.

In a statement released late Thursday afternoon, Stevens said he took full responsibility for the incident and is "embarrassed by what transpired."

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"What I did was wrong and there is no excuse for it," Stevens said. "Mr. Lowry deserves better, and I have reached out today in an attempt to directly apologize to him and other members of the Raptors and Warriors organizations."

"I hope that Mr. Lowry and others impacted by this lapse in judgment understand that the behavior I demonstrated last night does not reflect the person I am or have been throughout my life. I made a mistake and I'm truly sorry. I need to be better and look forward to making it right."

Stevens has served as a trustee at Menlo School in Atherton (though he is not listed as a current board member) and sits on the board of directors for Nvidia, Quantenna, Innovium and Second Spectrum, according to a profile on the S-Cubed Capital website. The website lists him as a special limited partner and former managing partner at Sequoia Capital, a Menlo Park-based venture capital firm.

In 2015 he and his wife Mary donated $50 million to the University of Southern California for a brain research program as part of a pledge to give away at least half of their wealth.

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Atherton resident, Warriors investor Mark Stevens receives one-year ban from NBA games after pushing player

Stevens says 'I need to be better' in apology

by / Almanac

Uploaded: Thu, Jun 6, 2019, 4:11 pm
Updated: Thu, Jun 6, 2019, 6:08 pm

Atherton resident and Golden State Warriors minority investor Mark Stevens has been fined $500,000 and barred from attending NBA games and Warriors team activities for one year after pushing a Toronto Raptors player and "directing obscene language" toward him during Game 3 of the NBA Finals on Wednesday night (June 5), according to a statement released Thursday.

Stevens, who is the managing partner of S-Cubed Capital, an investment holding company in Menlo Park, was sitting courtside at the game at Oracle Arena in Oakland when, during the fourth quarter, Raptors player Kyle Lowry landed near him in the seats after attempting to keep a ball from going out of bounds.

Stevens could be seen shoving Lowry's left shoulder and was also "directing obscene language" toward Lowry before the player got up, according to a joint statement from the NBA and Warriors. Stevens was ejected from the game after the incident.

Stevens' ban is effective immediately.

In a statement issued Thursday, Mike Bass, the NBA's executive vice president for communications, said: "A team representative must be held to the highest possible standard and the conduct of Golden State Warriors investor Mark Stevens last night was beyond unacceptable and has no place in our league."

Asked about the incident after the game, Lowry said in an ESPN interview: "He reached over and put his hands on me for no reason, then he said ... some vulgar words to me repeatedly. In our league, there's no place for that and honestly I hope he's never allowed to come to an NBA game."

The moment went viral on Thursday amid calls for further repercussions after Axios first revealed Stevens' identity. Some NBA fans on social media have argued that Stevens should be forced to sell his ownership stake in the Warriors.

NBA superstar LeBron James said in an Instagram post Thursday that as a minority owner, Stevens "knew exactly what he was doing which was so uncalled for."

"When you sit courtside you absolutely know what comes with being on the floor and if you don’t know it’s on the back on the ticket itself that states the guidelines," James wrote.

In a statement released late Thursday afternoon, Stevens said he took full responsibility for the incident and is "embarrassed by what transpired."

"What I did was wrong and there is no excuse for it," Stevens said. "Mr. Lowry deserves better, and I have reached out today in an attempt to directly apologize to him and other members of the Raptors and Warriors organizations."

"I hope that Mr. Lowry and others impacted by this lapse in judgment understand that the behavior I demonstrated last night does not reflect the person I am or have been throughout my life. I made a mistake and I'm truly sorry. I need to be better and look forward to making it right."

Stevens has served as a trustee at Menlo School in Atherton (though he is not listed as a current board member) and sits on the board of directors for Nvidia, Quantenna, Innovium and Second Spectrum, according to a profile on the S-Cubed Capital website. The website lists him as a special limited partner and former managing partner at Sequoia Capital, a Menlo Park-based venture capital firm.

In 2015 he and his wife Mary donated $50 million to the University of Southern California for a brain research program as part of a pledge to give away at least half of their wealth.

Comments

whatever
Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jun 6, 2019 at 4:22 pm
whatever, Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on Jun 6, 2019 at 4:22 pm
1 person likes this

Hmm, $50 million for brain research.


Dolly Patterson
Menlo Park: Stanford Weekend Acres
on Jun 6, 2019 at 6:43 pm
Dolly Patterson, Menlo Park: Stanford Weekend Acres
on Jun 6, 2019 at 6:43 pm
7 people like this

"Give away half your wealth!" Ha ha! Stevens hasn't even give 1/10 of his wealth if you check Chaarity Navigator. [Portion removed; keep it civil and stick to the topic.]

Really, I am an intense Warriors fan, but as far as I'm concerned Stevens has done such horrible damage to the good will, integrity, and common good of the Warriors, that it's fine w me if the Raptors win bc they have demonstrated such sportmanship and integrity. By allowing Stevens to invest, the Warriors have big time screwed up


Steve_J
Registered user
another community
on Jun 7, 2019 at 1:12 pm
Steve_J, another community
Registered user
on Jun 7, 2019 at 1:12 pm
1 person likes this

This incident should never occur in professional sports. May he should be forced to sell his shares.


pearl
Registered user
another community
on Jun 7, 2019 at 7:04 pm
pearl, another community
Registered user
on Jun 7, 2019 at 7:04 pm
3 people like this

Stevens should be forced to sell his ownership stake and banned from attending NBA games forever.

Kyle Lowry has my respect and support for the way he handled the matter.


Thoughtful
Registered user
another community
on Jun 7, 2019 at 9:22 pm
Thoughtful, another community
Registered user
on Jun 7, 2019 at 9:22 pm
5 people like this

I saw the video. It seemed to me Mark Stevens assumed the player was too aggressive crashing into the seats and reacted inappropriately. The fine and punishment assessed seem like a very strong sanction for making the mistake. I have to say that there seems like a very healthy dose of class warfare going on, and because Stevens is a billionaire, people want him to be pilloried even more. He made a mistake, and is paying what seems like a very high price. It's enough.


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