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California pulls the plug on gas-powered leaf blowers under new law

Legislation targets sales of new 'small off-road engine' equipment

A gas-powered leaf blower, lawnmower and other tools used by a gardening crew sit in the back of a pickup truck in Palo Alto. Embarcadero Media file photo by Veronica Weber.

Nearly three decades after Peninsula cities began implementing bans on gas-powered leaf blowers, the effort has found a foothold at the state level, with Gov. Gavin Newsom signing a bill on Oct. 9 that will phase out their sales.

Among the dozens of bills that Newsom signed in his final action of the legislative session is Assembly Bill 1346, which was authored by Assembly member Marc Berman, D-Menlo Park, and which directs the California Air Resources Board to adopt regulations by July 2022 that would prohibit new "small off-road engines" — a category that includes gas-powered leaf blowers, generators, pressure washers and chainsaws — by 2024.

In making the case for the bill, Berman cited their environmental impact. In a June speech on the floor of the Assembly, he noted that daily emissions of air pollution from small engines are projected to surpass those from passenger cars this year.

"These emissions worsen air quality and negatively impact human health, causing asthma and lung disease and other awful health impacts on landscaping professionals who breathe in exhaust day in and day out," Berman said.

For cities like Palo Alto, Los Altos and Menlo Park — all of which are in Berman's district — a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers is far from new. Los Altos banned them in 1991, becoming the first jurisdiction in the area to do so. Menlo Park and Palo Alto followed suit in 1998 and 2005, respectively, though Menlo Park's law was subsequently overturned in a referendum and Palo Alto's, which applies exclusively to residential neighborhoods, has not been vigilantly enforced.

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The new state law casts a wider net than these local ordinances. It applies to all devices with small off-road engines under 25 horsepower and unlike the local ordinances, which were prompted primarily by noise complaints, the state law focuses on greenhouse gas emissions and health impacts. The bill's passage makes California the first state to phase out gas-powered leaf blowers.

For some, particularly in the commercial sector, the shift could pose significant challenges, according to an analysis of AB 1346 by state Assembly staff. The analysis notes that for residential uses, rechargeable electric lawnmowers, leaf blowers and string trimmers have been "available for years and have significant market share." For commercial users, however, "there is very little market for zero-emission equipment as today's technology is relatively expensive and requires multiple batteries and/or frequent recharging and replacement."

Supporters of the bill hope to address the slow adoption of zero-emissions equipment by the commercial sector by both adopting the new restrictions and by appropriating $30 million in the budget to help small businesses make the switch. Minutes before the Senate voted 21-9 to approve the bill on Sept. 8, Sen. Ben Allen, D-Santa Monica, argued that the law is necessary to foster the state's transition to cleaner equipment.

"Unless we put pressure on the industry, they're not going to take the steps necessary to get these better lower-emission or zero-emission generators onto the market and widely available for folks," Allen said.

Not everyone agrees. Opponents of the bill argued that the legislation will impose unreasonable restrictions on landscapers while doing very little to address climate change. Sen. Brian Dahle, R-Bieber, suggested at a Sept. 8 hearing on the bill that a switch to electric equipment would make generators less reliable.

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"When the power is out, how are you going to charge your battery so that you can supposedly keep your refrigerator on?" Dahle asked during a Sept. 8 hearing on AB 1346. "We're converting everything to power because, for some reason, this Legislature hates fuel, which is very sustainable, easy to access and, when the power is off, you can still use it."

Assembly member Devon Mathis, R-Visalia, similarly argued that the bill would cause more harm than good. He characterized the bill at a Sept. 9 hearing as one that would create "severe regulations for the businesses that use this equipment without providing anywhere close to adequate funding to support the rebate programs necessary to support this transition."

A gardener uses a gas-powered leaf blower to clear leaves off a sidewalk in a residential neighborhood in Palo Alto. Embarcadero Media file photo by Veronica Weber.

"Many of these businesses are small and minority-owned and are predominant professions for Latino communities involving landscape, tree care and construction," Mathis said, before the Assembly approved the bill by a 49-21 vote.

Supporters of AB 1346 counter that the bill does not regulate use of existing gas-powered equipment but only purchase of new equipment. They also note that the bill includes exceptions for farmers and emergency responders. Assembly member Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, who worked with Berman to advance the bill and secure the funding, argued in a statement Monday that the bill would help address both the environmental and health impacts of small gas engines.

"It's time we phased out these super polluters, and help small landscaping businesses transition to cleaner alternatives," Gonzalez said in a statement Monday.

Berman's bill has also garnered support from organizations such as Sierra Club California, Union of Concerned Scientists and Coalition of Clean Air. Bill Magavern, policy director for Coalition for Clean Air, said in a statement that AB 1346 will "protect Californians' health by cleaning up the shockingly high pollution from small off-road engines like leaf blowers and lawn mowers." Daniel Barad, policy advocate with Sierra Club California, said the bill will "curb toxic pollution in California neighborhoods by addressing emissions from leaf blowers, lawn mowers and other small off-road engines."

"This bill is another important step towards breathable air and a livable climate in California," Barad said in a statement.

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California pulls the plug on gas-powered leaf blowers under new law

Legislation targets sales of new 'small off-road engine' equipment

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Oct 13, 2021, 1:54 pm

Nearly three decades after Peninsula cities began implementing bans on gas-powered leaf blowers, the effort has found a foothold at the state level, with Gov. Gavin Newsom signing a bill on Oct. 9 that will phase out their sales.

Among the dozens of bills that Newsom signed in his final action of the legislative session is Assembly Bill 1346, which was authored by Assembly member Marc Berman, D-Menlo Park, and which directs the California Air Resources Board to adopt regulations by July 2022 that would prohibit new "small off-road engines" — a category that includes gas-powered leaf blowers, generators, pressure washers and chainsaws — by 2024.

In making the case for the bill, Berman cited their environmental impact. In a June speech on the floor of the Assembly, he noted that daily emissions of air pollution from small engines are projected to surpass those from passenger cars this year.

"These emissions worsen air quality and negatively impact human health, causing asthma and lung disease and other awful health impacts on landscaping professionals who breathe in exhaust day in and day out," Berman said.

For cities like Palo Alto, Los Altos and Menlo Park — all of which are in Berman's district — a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers is far from new. Los Altos banned them in 1991, becoming the first jurisdiction in the area to do so. Menlo Park and Palo Alto followed suit in 1998 and 2005, respectively, though Menlo Park's law was subsequently overturned in a referendum and Palo Alto's, which applies exclusively to residential neighborhoods, has not been vigilantly enforced.

The new state law casts a wider net than these local ordinances. It applies to all devices with small off-road engines under 25 horsepower and unlike the local ordinances, which were prompted primarily by noise complaints, the state law focuses on greenhouse gas emissions and health impacts. The bill's passage makes California the first state to phase out gas-powered leaf blowers.

For some, particularly in the commercial sector, the shift could pose significant challenges, according to an analysis of AB 1346 by state Assembly staff. The analysis notes that for residential uses, rechargeable electric lawnmowers, leaf blowers and string trimmers have been "available for years and have significant market share." For commercial users, however, "there is very little market for zero-emission equipment as today's technology is relatively expensive and requires multiple batteries and/or frequent recharging and replacement."

Supporters of the bill hope to address the slow adoption of zero-emissions equipment by the commercial sector by both adopting the new restrictions and by appropriating $30 million in the budget to help small businesses make the switch. Minutes before the Senate voted 21-9 to approve the bill on Sept. 8, Sen. Ben Allen, D-Santa Monica, argued that the law is necessary to foster the state's transition to cleaner equipment.

"Unless we put pressure on the industry, they're not going to take the steps necessary to get these better lower-emission or zero-emission generators onto the market and widely available for folks," Allen said.

Not everyone agrees. Opponents of the bill argued that the legislation will impose unreasonable restrictions on landscapers while doing very little to address climate change. Sen. Brian Dahle, R-Bieber, suggested at a Sept. 8 hearing on the bill that a switch to electric equipment would make generators less reliable.

"When the power is out, how are you going to charge your battery so that you can supposedly keep your refrigerator on?" Dahle asked during a Sept. 8 hearing on AB 1346. "We're converting everything to power because, for some reason, this Legislature hates fuel, which is very sustainable, easy to access and, when the power is off, you can still use it."

Assembly member Devon Mathis, R-Visalia, similarly argued that the bill would cause more harm than good. He characterized the bill at a Sept. 9 hearing as one that would create "severe regulations for the businesses that use this equipment without providing anywhere close to adequate funding to support the rebate programs necessary to support this transition."

"Many of these businesses are small and minority-owned and are predominant professions for Latino communities involving landscape, tree care and construction," Mathis said, before the Assembly approved the bill by a 49-21 vote.

Supporters of AB 1346 counter that the bill does not regulate use of existing gas-powered equipment but only purchase of new equipment. They also note that the bill includes exceptions for farmers and emergency responders. Assembly member Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, who worked with Berman to advance the bill and secure the funding, argued in a statement Monday that the bill would help address both the environmental and health impacts of small gas engines.

"It's time we phased out these super polluters, and help small landscaping businesses transition to cleaner alternatives," Gonzalez said in a statement Monday.

Berman's bill has also garnered support from organizations such as Sierra Club California, Union of Concerned Scientists and Coalition of Clean Air. Bill Magavern, policy director for Coalition for Clean Air, said in a statement that AB 1346 will "protect Californians' health by cleaning up the shockingly high pollution from small off-road engines like leaf blowers and lawn mowers." Daniel Barad, policy advocate with Sierra Club California, said the bill will "curb toxic pollution in California neighborhoods by addressing emissions from leaf blowers, lawn mowers and other small off-road engines."

"This bill is another important step towards breathable air and a livable climate in California," Barad said in a statement.

Comments

Joseph E. Davis
Registered user
Woodside: Emerald Hills
on Oct 13, 2021 at 2:47 pm
Joseph E. Davis, Woodside: Emerald Hills
Registered user
on Oct 13, 2021 at 2:47 pm

I'm thankful that I bought a generator before this latest assault on common sense by our insane rulers. Before forcing full electric conversion, it would be wise to have better than 3rd world electrical reliability in place.


Really !
Registered user
Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 14, 2021 at 1:01 pm
Really !, Atherton: Lindenwood
Registered user
on Oct 14, 2021 at 1:01 pm

Good point Joe. A gas generator is needed when PG&E can't provide electric power.

You guys are SO NOT GETTING IT:
"These emissions worsen air quality and negatively impact human health, causing asthma and lung disease and other awful health impacts on landscaping professionals who breathe in exhaust day in and day out," Berman said.

Are you NOT including the health impact of the flumes of carcinogenic laden dirt and debris that ALL BLOWERS blow into the air, floating hundreds of feet. WE ALL BREATHE THAT AIR.

Also, until China decommissions their 1,100 coal burning energy plants (hundreds more coming online in 2021-2022, seems pointless to mandate gas powered anything - from blowers, to furnaces, to water heaters, etc.


been there
Registered user
Atherton: Lindenwood
on Oct 14, 2021 at 5:30 pm
been there, Atherton: Lindenwood
Registered user
on Oct 14, 2021 at 5:30 pm

Banning generators? Yes. The new law bans generators. What are we supposed to do when the lights go out and our refrigerators stop working?
Oh! Yes! We can buy an electric version. A generator that works on electricity. Of course. Just plug it in when the power goes out........ Right.
Remember. We elected them.


Peter Carpenter
Registered user
Menlo Park: Park Forest
on Oct 14, 2021 at 7:15 pm
Peter Carpenter, Menlo Park: Park Forest
Registered user
on Oct 14, 2021 at 7:15 pm

Easy solution - buy a BIG generator.


MP Reader
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on Oct 15, 2021 at 9:35 pm
MP Reader, Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on Oct 15, 2021 at 9:35 pm

Happy to see these changes kicking in state-wide! We have an outdoor air quality sensor, and the difference in air quality is noticeable when gardeners are nearby using gas-powered equipment. We own electric/battery powered lawn equipment and it's been great for us -- no issues over several years of use. And as a bonus, comparatively our electric equipment needs no real maintenance, oiling, fumbling with gas cans, etc. There's a lot of irony in the concerns about having gas generators as a backup to use when PGE has an outage -- more and more these days, those outages are climate change related (either spikes in demand after extreme weather, or preemptive shutoffs). Climate change cuts deeper each year into our quality of life whether we like it or not. This change for the benefit of our climate is much-needed and not a day too soon.


Peter Carpenter
Registered user
Menlo Park: Park Forest
on Oct 15, 2021 at 9:46 pm
Peter Carpenter, Menlo Park: Park Forest
Registered user
on Oct 15, 2021 at 9:46 pm

There is no irony in have a natural gas powered generator to use when PG&E is having an outage and my solar system cannot carry the load - it is simply good planning.


Willows Dad
Registered user
Menlo Park: The Willows
on Oct 22, 2021 at 3:30 pm
Willows Dad, Menlo Park: The Willows
Registered user
on Oct 22, 2021 at 3:30 pm

It's time for the city to ban these nuisances.


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