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Coronavirus central: State announces plans to roll out vaccine boosters after full federal approval

Officials also preparing groundwork for administering doses to children ages 12 and under

Latest updates:

STATE ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR VACCINE BOOSTERS: State officials announced their plan Thursday to roll out COVID-19 vaccine booster doses to eligible residents once they are fully approved by the federal government. Read more below.

HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICIALS WANT STATE TO REQUIRE COVID VACCINATIONS FOR STUDENTS: Sequoia Union High School District officials are asking the state to require students to get the COVID-19 vaccine in order to attend classes in person. Read the full story.

MENLO COLLEGE'S VACCINATION RATE NEARS 100%: The 1,000 students, faculty and staff milling about Menlo College in Atherton have one thing in common: Nearly all are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Read the full story.

YOUR COVID-19 VACCINE QUESTIONS — ANSWERED: We've compiled a list of who can currently get vaccinated in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, plus answers to common questions and links to resources. Read the full Q&A.

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COVID-19 TESTS AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT: Santa Clara County is operating appointment-only COVID-19 test sites on a rotating basis. View the full list.

Coronavirus, by the numbers

State officials announce plans to roll out COVID vaccine boosters after full federal approval

State officials announced their plan Thursday to roll out COVID-19 vaccine booster doses to eligible residents once they are fully approved by the federal government.

The state intends to ensure that enough doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and vaccine administrators will be available to meet demand once boosters are fully approved for people over age 65 and those at high risk to contract the virus and develop serious illness.

The state's MyTurn vaccination scheduling tool will soon add a booster vaccine eligibility screen and send alerts to state residents if they are eligible, according to Gov. Gavin Newsom and the California Department of Public Health.

"Along with boosting protection to those that need it and proactively reaching out to newly eligible individuals, the state will continue to focus much of our vaccination efforts on reaching the unvaccinated and encouraging them to get vaccinated to keep themselves and their community safe," state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said in a statement.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued its approval Wednesday of an extra dose of the two-dose Pfizer vaccine for those 65 and older as well as people age 12-64 who are at higher risk of serious illness because of some medical conditions or the nature of their job.

An advisory panel to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control also gave its approval Thursday of an additional Pfizer dose for the same demographics with the exception of those at risk because of their jobs.

Once fully approved by the CDC in addition to the FDA, people eligible for booster doses will be advised to get them at least six months after getting their second dose of the vaccine.

State and federal officials have argued booster doses will be necessary for at least some people given the propensity for the high level of immunity offered by the two-dose Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to reduce over time while still preventing serious illness and death.

"CDPH is working with local partners and health care providers to ensure California is ready to immediately begin administering booster doses to eligible Californians once these recommendations have been made," state Public Health Officer and CDPH Director Dr. Tomas Aragon said.

State officials also announced Thursday that they're laying the groundwork to begin administering COVID-19 vaccines to children younger than 12, which are expected to be approved by federal regulators in the coming weeks.

Ghaly noted that state public health officials are also discussing a potential statewide COVID-19 vaccine requirement for students age 12 and older.

The state already requires students to get vaccinated against various illnesses, including measles, polio, chickenpox, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis.

For coverage by subject — how the virus is affecting public health, residents, schools, cities, businesses, nonprofits, arts groups, etc. — please go to our Wakelet page.

View an archive of previous updates here.

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Bay City News Service contributed to this report.

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Coronavirus central: State announces plans to roll out vaccine boosters after full federal approval

Officials also preparing groundwork for administering doses to children ages 12 and under

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, May 28, 2020, 11:23 am
Updated: Fri, Sep 24, 2021, 11:20 am

Latest updates:

STATE ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR VACCINE BOOSTERS: State officials announced their plan Thursday to roll out COVID-19 vaccine booster doses to eligible residents once they are fully approved by the federal government. Read more below.

HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICIALS WANT STATE TO REQUIRE COVID VACCINATIONS FOR STUDENTS: Sequoia Union High School District officials are asking the state to require students to get the COVID-19 vaccine in order to attend classes in person. Read the full story.

MENLO COLLEGE'S VACCINATION RATE NEARS 100%: The 1,000 students, faculty and staff milling about Menlo College in Atherton have one thing in common: Nearly all are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Read the full story.

YOUR COVID-19 VACCINE QUESTIONS — ANSWERED: We've compiled a list of who can currently get vaccinated in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, plus answers to common questions and links to resources. Read the full Q&A.

COVID-19 TESTS AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT: Santa Clara County is operating appointment-only COVID-19 test sites on a rotating basis. View the full list.

State officials announced their plan Thursday to roll out COVID-19 vaccine booster doses to eligible residents once they are fully approved by the federal government.

The state intends to ensure that enough doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and vaccine administrators will be available to meet demand once boosters are fully approved for people over age 65 and those at high risk to contract the virus and develop serious illness.

The state's MyTurn vaccination scheduling tool will soon add a booster vaccine eligibility screen and send alerts to state residents if they are eligible, according to Gov. Gavin Newsom and the California Department of Public Health.

"Along with boosting protection to those that need it and proactively reaching out to newly eligible individuals, the state will continue to focus much of our vaccination efforts on reaching the unvaccinated and encouraging them to get vaccinated to keep themselves and their community safe," state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said in a statement.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued its approval Wednesday of an extra dose of the two-dose Pfizer vaccine for those 65 and older as well as people age 12-64 who are at higher risk of serious illness because of some medical conditions or the nature of their job.

An advisory panel to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control also gave its approval Thursday of an additional Pfizer dose for the same demographics with the exception of those at risk because of their jobs.

Once fully approved by the CDC in addition to the FDA, people eligible for booster doses will be advised to get them at least six months after getting their second dose of the vaccine.

State and federal officials have argued booster doses will be necessary for at least some people given the propensity for the high level of immunity offered by the two-dose Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to reduce over time while still preventing serious illness and death.

"CDPH is working with local partners and health care providers to ensure California is ready to immediately begin administering booster doses to eligible Californians once these recommendations have been made," state Public Health Officer and CDPH Director Dr. Tomas Aragon said.

State officials also announced Thursday that they're laying the groundwork to begin administering COVID-19 vaccines to children younger than 12, which are expected to be approved by federal regulators in the coming weeks.

Ghaly noted that state public health officials are also discussing a potential statewide COVID-19 vaccine requirement for students age 12 and older.

The state already requires students to get vaccinated against various illnesses, including measles, polio, chickenpox, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis.

For coverage by subject — how the virus is affecting public health, residents, schools, cities, businesses, nonprofits, arts groups, etc. — please go to our Wakelet page.

View an archive of previous updates here.

Bay City News Service contributed to this report.

Comments

Whatever
Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on May 28, 2020 at 7:52 pm
Whatever, Menlo Park: Central Menlo Park
on May 28, 2020 at 7:52 pm

The higher Hispanic covid rate in SM County. Is there a breakout in the MP figures for Bel Haven residents? When populations have to segregate in certain areas to afford housing etc, it almost always has resulted in more crowded living. This has been going on for centuries. Also one would suspect covid numbers are low for the group since a larger % of the population is unable to afford or obtain health care. And a greater % needs to keep working to support family because many of the jobs don't have the work at home option or even sick leave, so there is greater chance of infection from work.
Also now that construction has started up again will the figures increase?
Does the State or county have programs in place to address this covid inequality issue?

By the way editor how about a new topic choice: Covid- 19.


Menlo Voter.
Menlo Park: other
on May 29, 2020 at 8:41 am
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
on May 29, 2020 at 8:41 am

I can't say I'm surprised. I drive through the North Fair Oaks area fairly regularly and I routinely see street vendors with no face mask, no gloves and not practicing social distancing. And their clientele aren't either. I often wondered driving by these scenes if we would see higher rates of infection in that community. Now we know.


Bay Area Residents
another community
on Jul 8, 2020 at 12:28 pm
Bay Area Residents, another community
on Jul 8, 2020 at 12:28 pm

Protestors. I can't believe not a single word blames the protestors. So quick to blame the people doing their best to live a normal life and quick to throw stone at business owners.

Stop the protesting then it stops the spread. It got worse the very moment people protested.


Menlo Voter.
Menlo Park: other
on Jul 8, 2020 at 2:16 pm
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
on Jul 8, 2020 at 2:16 pm

Bay Area REsidents:

perhaps no one is blaming protesters because they're not to blame.

"Research Determines Protests Did Not Cause Spike In Coronavirus Cases"

Web Link

But don't let facts get in the way of your opinion.


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